Category Archives: NEWS

Honda Accord Named 2018 Canadian Car of the Year

Markham, Ontario / The all-new 2018 Honda Accord has earned the prestigious Canadian Car of the Year award presented by the Automobile Journalists Association of Canada (AJAC). The previous generation Accord was also the recipient of the award in 2013.

“We’re honoured and humbled to receive this recognition from a group of respected automotive journalists in Canada,” said Jean Marc Leclerc, Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Honda Canada. “We’re both proud and thankful for all of our associates who supported the production and development of this vehicle and for our passionate customers who have supported the Accord for the past forty years.”

Testing for the 2018 AJAC Canadian Car of the Year Awards was conducted throughout the year in a variety of road conditions by some of Canada’s notable automotive journalists from across the country. AJAC members also had a chance to compare vehicles back-to-back at the annual “TestFest” event held October 25 and 26 at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park in Bowmanville, Ontario.

The all-new 2018 Accord is upscale and sophisticated, confident and distinctive, youthful and sporty. Completely redesigned from the ground-up, the all-new Accord features a lighter and more rigid body structure, an advanced new chassis design wrapped in a more sophisticated, sleek and athletic design with top class interior space and comfort. The drivetrain options include two all-new, high-torque VTEC® Turbo engines, the world’s first 10-speed automatic transmission for a front-drive car and a new generation of Honda’s two-motor hybrid technology.

2018 Honda Fit Sport Quick Spin Review | Cheap and cheerful as its ancestors

ALEX KIERSTEIN
Feb 5th 2018 at 11:45AM
Source: https://www.autoblog.com/2018/02/05/2018-honda-fit-sport-review/


Image Credit: Alex Kierstein

The undeniable charm of the perky Honda Fit hatchback

The suburban Seattle area was (and still is) full of 5- to 10-year-old Honda Civics, and it feels like it’s been that way forever. A steady supply of reliable, inexpensive, efficient, and perhaps even attractive used cars fed a serious tuner community with its own style. Forget about the Hollywood glam rock of the “Fast and Furious” franchise; the Seattle look was low and clean, varying between functional handling improvements and something that would later evolve into the stance movement. And just like the 2018 Honda Fit I drove for a week, there was a fundamental goodness to them that transcended their economy car bones.

Of course, from the fourth-generation car in 1987 up until the seventh-generation cars in 2001, all Civics had fundamentally good suspension design. It was a place that Honda spent some extra money, rather than simply fit MacPherson struts and call it a day. Not only did that mean there was good geometry to start with, there was room for the aftermarket to improve upon things significantly without having to reengineer the A-arms.

The shift linkages were also stellar, using a pair of rods instead of the cheaper cable solution — something that wouldn’t last, although Honda still manages to make cable shifters feel pretty good. But the point is, Civics were cheap economy cars that managed to be a hoot to drive, and a great starting point for builds — FWD drag cars, corner carvers, or slammed cruisers. The Civic, more than any other car around here, made it possible to have a lot of fun for not a lot of money.


Image Credit: Alex Kierstein

Which brings us to the Fit, which given the size increase of the Civic is probably the closest analogue to the pre-2001 Civics in the lineup. Yes, a lot has changed. There’s no rod-actuated shift linkage, and it’s got MacPherson struts up front with a twist-beam semi-independent rear end. That money saved is applied to things the driver can appreciate all the time, like comfy seats and a touchscreen infotainment system that would have dropped jaws in an Acura in 1998 — as well as expensive things under the skin, like airbags, a much beefier crash structure, and the 1.5-liter Earth Dreams engine.

A note about that. While some high-trim versions of the Civic got VTEC (like the D16 SOHC VTEC in EX trims, or the efficiency-oriented VTEC-E system in the HX in sixth generation Civics), the Earth Dreams engine is much more complex. Instead of multi-point port injection, the engine uses direct injection. More to the point, the valvetrain is much more complex. It’s DOHC, for one, and utilizes the latest version of i-VTEC which includes continuously variable cam phasing on both the intake and exhaust cams, and also variable intake lift. These systems are expensive, as are tuning them to meet contemporary emissions and efficiency standards.

On the other hand, the 130 horsepower (at 6,600 RPM) and 114 pound-feet of torque (at 4,600 RPM) the Fit makes bests the 1996 Civic EX’s once laudable figures by a fair margin. That car made 127 hp (6,600 RPM) and a measly 107 lb-ft (5,500 RPM) — and that peak torque came 900 RPM later than the Fit’s. A sixth-generation coupe weighed just 2,342 pounds, while the Fit is much heavier — 2,522 pounds. Those extra pounds can be explained by the far more rigorous safety equipment requirements.

2018 Honda Fit Sport
Image Credit: Alex Kierstein

This is a very long introduction before getting to driving impressions, but I wanted to convey the many ways in which the Fit is similar, and the equally important ways that it’s different, from the cars that basically made Honda’s reputation in this country. To circle back around, the 1990s Civics weren’t built with the conscious purpose to become enthusiast cars. They simply were built with high-quality parts that improved the experience, whether you were just puttering around town in a DX hatchback or club racing in an EX coupe. And the Fit, more than any Honda since the first-generation Fit, nails that improbable balance — imperfectly.

In basic terms, playing rough with the Fit pays off. It’s undeniably slow, but that means most backroad maneuvers are sometimes full throttle affairs. The tighter the road, the more momentum you need to cary to make it out of the corner with some semblance of pace, the more it thrives. Echoes of earlier Civics resonate here — and more here than most cars on the market, which don’t have to be worked this hard to be enjoyed (itself an enjoyable exercise), or aren’t fun enough to incentivize being worked so hard.

The cable-operated shifter and extremely light clutch pedal become, after a small adjustment period, completely subconscious actions. Likewise, the pedal box is ideal for throttle blipping in a tight corner quickly and precisely, which helps preserve even more momentum. This is all good, because keeping the Fit moving requires a lot of shifting.


Image Credit: Alex Kierstein

Get deep into the rhythm and you can ignore the flaws, because this isn’t a mid-1990s Civic reincarnated after all. The electric steering rack has been improved from last year’s design with a bearing revision, but it’s still a lifeless thing that doesn’t tell you much about what the front end is doing. And the stock suspension allows reasonable road-holding but without the confidence of older or better Hondas. Road imperfections cause the Fit to pitch and buck in unexpected ways — although it doesn’t seem to diminish grip much. The thing to do is press on, ignoring the disconcerting body motions and numb steering, since they don’t affect progress all that much.

If you’re a Fit owner interested in slaloming up and down the canyons, there’s a semi-aftermarket solution: HFP springs and dampers. My car wasn’t so fitted, but we drove an HFP-modified Fit earlier this year, and it nails the dynamics that made old Civics so charismatic.

But even the dead stock Fit Sport I drove, with its heft and dynamic foibles, has more vintage Honda character than anything comparable — not to mention packaging efficiency and cargo-carrying abilities that are near miraculous. The tiny details, like the cupholder to the left of the steering wheel, exude an offbeat charm, too. In a market overrun with crossovers that carry less with far less charm, the Fit reminds me again of all the reasons people fell in love with Hondas in the first place.

February Sales Promotions

Limited time lease offer available through Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS), to qualified retail customers on approved credit. Weekly payments include freight and PDI ($1,655), tire & environmental fee ($17.50), A/C charge ($100), and OMVIC fee ($10). Taxes, licence, insurance and registration are extra. ΩRepresentative weekly lease example: 2018 Civic LX Sedan 6MT (Model FC2E5JE) // 2018 Civic SE Sedan CVT (Model FC2F6JEX) // 2018 Civic LX Coupe 6MT (Model FC4A5JEZ) // 2018 Civic LX Hatch 6MT (Model FK7G2JE) on a 60-month term with 260 weekly payments at 2.99% // 2.99% // 2.99% // 2.99% lease APR. Weekly payment is $60.82 // $68.82 // $64.47 // $67.78 with $0 down or equivalent trade-in and $270 // $220 // $0 // $0 total lease incentive included. Down payments, $0 security deposit and first weekly payments due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $15,812.42 // $17,893.63 // $16,763.21 // $17,623.57. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. PPSA lien registration fee of $45.93 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.65, due at time of delivery are not included. For all offers: licence, insurance, PPSA, other taxes (including HST) and excess wear and tear are extra. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. Offers only valid for Ontario residents at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. Dealer may lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Colour availability may vary by dealer. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. Offers, prices and features subject to change without notice. See your Ontario Honda Dealer or visit HondaOntario.com for full details. ♦♦Based on Association of International Automobile Manufacturers of Canada (AIAMC) data reflecting sales between 1997 and December 2017.

Limited time lease offer available through Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS), to qualified retail customers on approved credit. Weekly payments include freight and PDI ($1,795), tire & environmental fee ($17.50), A/C charge ($100), and OMVIC fee ($10). Taxes, licence, insurance and registration are extra. ΩRepresentative weekly lease example: 2018 CR-V LX 2WD CVT (Model RW1H3JES) on a 60-month term with 260 weekly payments at 3.99% lease APR. Weekly payment is $81.73 with $0 down or equivalent trade-in and $420 total lease incentive included. Down payment, $0 security deposit and first weekly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $21,249.07. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. PPSA lien registration fee of $45.93 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.65, due at time of delivery are not included. For all offers: licence, insurance, PPSA, other taxes (including HST) and excess wear and tear are extra. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. Offers only valid for Ontario residents at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. Dealer may lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Colour availability may vary by dealer. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. Offers, prices and features subject to change without notice. See your Ontario Honda Dealer or visit HondaOntario.com for full details.

Review of the Week: January 30, 2018

 

 

January 30th, 2018

“I stumbled across a listing on Autotrader for a trade in they had as I was looking for an SUV (Happen to be a Dodge Journey in my case). I decided to check out the SUV in person so I booked an online appt for a test drive. Within the hour sales rep Marci replied back to confirm a time. She was very friendly and helpful as she came in a few hours prior to her scheduled time to accommodate my test drive appt. After deciding I liked the colour, features and drive of the Journey we discussed trade in and pricing. Turns out my previous vehicle was in a accident which really hurt the trade in value. Marci and the team at Honda went to work to do their best to provide me more value for my trade in to accommodate my budget. Overall a great experience and I would recommend Honda Cambridge if looking for a Honda vehicle or one of their trade ins too! Thanks!!” – Chris

Thank you Chris for sharing your experience with us via Facebook!

2018 DealerRater Consumer Satisfaction Award

DealerRater Recognizes Cambridge Centre Honda with a Consumer Satisfaction Award

The dealership is among the top auto dealers in Canada that demonstrate excellent customer service, as rated by online consumer reviews.

Cambridge, ON – January 2018 – Cambridge Centre Honda has been awarded a 2018 DealerRater Consumer Satisfaction Award, an annual recognition given to auto dealerships that deliver outstanding customer service as rated by online consumer reviews. This is Cambridge Centre Honda’s third Consumer Satisfaction Award; receiving awards in 2016 and 2017. DealerRater, the world’s leading car dealer review website, created the Consumer Satisfaction Award program to let online car shoppers instantly spot dealers that provide high-quality customer service.

Consumer Satisfaction Awards are given to the top 10 percent of U.S. new-car dealers based on their PowerScore™, as well as top independent and Canadian dealerships that receive at least 25 annual reviews and maintain an average PowerScore™ rating of 4.0 out of 5.0. The PowerScore™ is determined using a Bayesian algorithm that factors the dealership’s average DealerRater consumer rating and the total number of reviews written about the dealership during the 2017 calendar year.

DealerRater features more than four million dealer reviews, and has a reachable audience of more than 32 million car shoppers each month. “Our awards program was more competitive than ever this past year, with thousands of dealers across the U.S. and Canada competing to win our coveted Dealer of the Year award,” says Oldershaw. “The Consumer Satisfaction Award is one way for today’s shoppers to instantly recognize quality customer service regardless of brand or region.”

About DealerRater
Founded in 2002, DealerRater, a Cars.com Company, is the world’s leading car dealer review website that connects consumers with the right person at the right dealership. The site offers more than 4 million sales and service reviews across 42,000 U.S. and Canadian dealerships, including a network of more than 6,000 Certified Dealers. DealerRater content has a reachable audience of more than 32 million consumers across the web each month. By offering a product suite that allows qualified dealerships to manage their reputations and achieve higher SEO rankings, DealerRater supports new customer connections by growing online presence.

About Cambridge Centre Honda
Our philosophy is simple: We believe that buying and owning a car should be easy, enjoyable and transparent. At Cambridge Centre Honda, we tell the truth, we keep our promises, and we hold our customers and our team in high esteem. We have been serving the community of the greater Kitchener-Waterloo area for over three decades. George and Wendy Morin opened their Cambridge dealership in 1977 and today their daughter, Nicole Pereira, serves as President and CEO. We know that you have the highest expectations of the vehicles you drive and of the people you trust to help you out. When you do business with Cambridge Centre Honda you become part of our family, and that’s why our customers keep coming back. Stop by and see for yourself! – Nicole Pereira & Team

Driven: 2018 Honda Accord Touring

JUSTIN PRITCHARD
Published January 23, 2018 – 9:31am
Last Updated January 23, 2018 – 9:32am
Source: http://thechronicleherald.ca/wheelsnews/1539054-driven-2018-honda-accord-touring

Our 2018 Honda Accord Touring tester was powered by its 1.5-litre, four-cylinder, turbo engine. (JUSTIN PRITCHARD)
Our 2018 Honda Accord Touring tester was powered by its 1.5-litre, four-cylinder, turbo engine. (JUSTIN PRITCHARD)

For the next few years, the new-for-2018 Honda Accord will carry Honda’s presence, once again, into the family-sedan marketplace.

There’s something that Honda just gets “right” about this machine every time they re-do it and that changes from generation to generation. After a week at the wheel in the latest Accord, it seems like the right recipe this time around is cooked up around a fantastic driveline, as well as some of the most user-friendly high-tech on the scene today.

The cabin in my Touring-grade tester set the stage with a partially-digital instrument cluster, a wide-screen central command touch interface with Android Auto, a nearby wireless charging pad, and a head up display, which looks markedly better than one I recently used in a $185,000 BMW.

Signs of the times include numerous high-output USB charging ports and the inclusion of virtually every outward-looking hazard detection system available on this side of a fighter jet. Accord’s Honda sensing technology analyzes your driving environment for possible threats, like an elevated collision risk, cars in your blind spot, an unintended lane departure and more.

The new interior is Accord’s most lavish and upscale yet, with matte wood trim, gorgeous after-dark illumination, detailed aluminum trim, and a multitude of elements that wouldn’t look or feel out place in a car costing 15 grand more. There are new interfaces. New graphics. New details, like knobs and buttons, that click precisely like a computer mouse.

Thankfully, the cabin also maintains a few elements that many owners have appreciated in former Accord generations. These include heaps of nearby storage for smaller items via clever bins and cubbies, along with adequate or greater room for four adults, generous rear seats and a strong horizontal element to the dash design which visually pumps up the sense of width and space.

All said, it’s a tidy, well laid-out, formal, thoughtful and spacious driving environment.

Importantly, it’s also remarkably easy to use the high-tech — and that’s even if you haven’t bought a new car in a while and find much of this newfangled gadgetry a bit overwhelming. Controls and interfaces and menus are straightforward, a cinch to navigate, and you get little tool-tips that pop up via the partially-digital instrument cluster, helping guide you along in many cases. It’s more high-tech than an Accord has ever been, but also, very easy to get comfortable with.

Honda’s new 1.5-litre, turbo, four-cylinder engine is standard, with horsepower and torque rated at 192 apiece. Peak torque arrives from just 1,600 revs, allowing the engine to perform very well from very low revs compared to a non-turbo four-cylinder with similar output. Expect big low-end responsiveness and admirable get up and go while using minimal revs and fuel. Plus, less revs means less noise and vibration. Here’s a refined and effortless powerplant which feels most impressive when operated gently.

The CVT transmission has no gears to shift, further helping the engine run at lower revs more of the time, enhancing refinement and saving more fuel.

A six-speed stick is available, as is a larger two-litre turbo four-cylinder engine as the up-level powerplant, if you like. The V6 from the last-generation Accord is toast.

Test-driving shoppers will likely note a nice balance between sporty tautness and overall comfort in the ride quality department. The shocks are slightly firm, with a layer of softness around the edges of their travel that ensures the ride is never jarring or jagged, and that it rarely crashes into bumps. It’s athletic, not uncomfortably so. The rigidity of the body structure also stands out — hit a bump or pothole and the car feels super-strong, like it’s hewn from cast titanium.

Brakes flaunt strong bite from the first bit of pedal, and near sports-car precision, without feeling too touchy. There’s lots of confidence imparted when drivers need to get stationary in a hurry.

There’s also lots of confidence from the headlights. The LED-fired units are top-notch, with plenty of white, bright light output sent far and wide up the road. This is top-of-the-line lighting performance and it’s standard on all trim grades.

Still, I think this car just has three problems. First, in loaded Touring grade like the tester, pricing lands at the better part of $36,000, which is a tad steep. Second, I don’t find this is a great looking machine. Distinctive, yes. Attractive? Maybe not. Third, road noise levels were a measure higher than expected, though the tester’s winter tires may have been partly to blame.

Of course, you’re mostly buying an Accord for the sensible stuff — safety, resale value, reliability and fuel mileage. And on those fronts, this machine should be considered a priority test drive, especially if you’re after one of the best powertrains and some of the best technology currently on offer in the segment.

The specs

Model: 2018 Honda Accord Touring
Engine: 1.5-litre four-cylinder turbo
Drivetrain: front-wheel drive
Observed mileage: 8.6L/100km
Transmission: continually variable transmission (CVT)
Features: Android Auto, automatic climate control, push-button start, wireless charging pad, automatic lights, lane keeping system, radar cruise control, heated leather
What’s hot: easy-to-use tech, plenty of room, comfy and sporty ride, feels solid and robust, excellent lights, excellent powertrain
What’s not: styling not for everyone, gets pricey with options, higher-than-expected noise levels at speed
Price as tested (Accord Touring 1.5) $35,790

2018 Honda Fit

JANUARY 2018 

BY ALEXANDER STOKLOSA PHOTOS BY CHRIS AMOS

Source: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2018-honda-fit-in-depth-model-review

2018 Honda Fit

Overall Rating: 4/5 Stars

Honda’s Fit is aptly named: You can fit much more stuff inside it than in any other subcompact thanks to its boxy shape and multi-way folding rear seats. It also is a strong value, with class-competitive refinement and build quality and a $17,080 base price. The 2018 model adds active safety features such as adaptive cruise control, lane-keeping assist, and automated emergency braking as optional or standard equipment on every trim level, further distancing the Fit from its humble competitors. What the Fit doesn’t fit into its mix of capabilities is fun. Although you can get it with a manual gearbox, the Fit is at best pleasant to drive—which is a bit of a disappointment considering that the previous-generation model was more engaging while being equally practical. But if impressive interior space and versatility in a tiny package are what you’re looking for, the Fit is still a car we highly recommend.

HIGHS
Peerless interior packaging, multi-way folding rear seats, excellent fuel economy.

LOWS
Quite slow, buzzy engine, handling isn’t as fun as in Fits past.

VERDICT
Still the small car to buy if you must buy small.

What’s New for 2018?
The Fit, which debuted in its current configuration back in 2015, received a mid-cycle refresh for 2018. Honda has made automated emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, lane-departure warning, and lane-keeping assist available on the little hatch. The previous-generation Fit’s Sport trim returns to the lineup, too, albeit with solely cosmetic upgrades including black-painted wheels, a chrome exhaust tip, and a more aggressive rear bumper. Every Fit benefits from retuned suspension and steering components aimed at bringing back some of the driving fun for which their predecessors were known.

Trims and Options We’d Choose
Honda’s Fit is basic transportation, plain and simple, so we see no reason to opt for anything beyond the lower trim levels. Besides, the new-for-2018 active safety features are optional on every model—although on every version save for the EX, they’re paired with a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT). We’d skip the fancy safety gear and nab the $18,390 Fit Sport. One rung up the Fit ladder from the base LX, it adds:

• 7.0-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto
• 16-inch black-painted aluminum wheels
• A natty body kit
• Leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob

Stick with the standard six-speed manual transmission to extract the best performance from the Fit’s 130-hp four-cylinder engine. If you must have a manual transmission plus automated emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, lane-keeping assist, and forward-collision warning (and don’t mind a sunroof), the $19,050 EX manual would be our next choice. Beyond that, the Fit begins to overlap with the considerably larger, more powerful, and comfier Civic hatchback lineup.

Honda Accord and Acura MDX voted ‘Best in Class’ by Automobile Journalist Association of Canada

JANUARY 2018

Source: https://www.honda.ca/newsdetails/nca/en/news/release/Honda-Accord-and-Acura-MDX-voted-Best-in-Class-by-Automobile-Journalist-Association-of-Canada

MONTREAL, QC (January 18, 2018) – The Honda Accord midsize sedan and Acura MDX luxury SUV were named Automobile Journalists Association of Canada’s (AJAC) Best Large Car and Best Large Premium Utility Vehicle, respectively, today at the Montreal International Auto Show. Each vehicle is now eligible for the overall Car and Truck of the Year awards, which will be announced on February 15 at the Canadian International Auto Show in Toronto.

“On behalf of all our associates across the country, I’d like to thank AJAC for these awards,” said Jean Marc Leclerc, Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Honda Canada Inc. “We’re extremely proud to see the Honda Accord and Acura MDX recognized by so many of Canada’s top journalists.”

The 2017 AJAC Canadian Car of the Year Awards was conducted throughout the year in a variety of road conditions by some of Canada’s notable automotive journalists from across the country. AJAC members also had a chance to compare vehicles back-to-back at the annual “TestFest” event held October 25 and 26 at Canadian Tire Motosport Park in Bowmanville, Ontario.

The all-new 2018 Accord is upscale and sophisticated, confident and distinctive, youthful and sporty. Completely redesigned from the ground-up, the all-new Accord features a lighter and more rigid body structure, an advanced new chassis design wrapped in a more sophisticated, sleek and athletic design with top class interior space and comfort. The drivetrain options include two all-new, high-torque VTEC® Turbo engines, the world’s first 10-speed automatic transmission for a front-drive car and a new generation of Honda’s two-motor hybrid technology.

The refreshed 2018 MDX luxury SUV features bold new styling, new luxury features and available Sport Hybrid Super Handling-All Wheel Drive™ (SH-AWD®) powertrain technology. Showcasing the new face of Acura, the restyled MDX is highlighted by a bold and distinctive new diamond pentagon grille.

Honda Clarity Series and CR-V Honored as the Most Innovative Car and SUV By 2018 Edmunds CES Tech Driven Awards

NEWS PROVIDED BY American Honda Motor Co., Inc. 

Jan 17, 2018, 08:00 ET

Source: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/honda-clarity-series-and-cr-v-honored-as-the-most-innovative-car-and-suv-by-2018-edmunds-ces-tech-driven-awards-300582405.html

Honda Clarity Series and CR-V Honored as the Most Innovative Car and SUV By 2018 Edmunds CES Tech Driven Awards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TORRANCE, Calif., Jan. 17, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Reflecting Honda’s progressive approach to design and technology, the editors at Edmunds.com named the 2018 CR-V and all-new Clarity series the Most Innovative SUV and Car of the Year, respectively, in the 2018 Edmunds CES Tech Driven Awards.

“With wins in two of six categories, it is clear that pushing the boundaries of automotive innovation is in Honda’s DNA,” said Alistair Weaver, Edmunds editor-in-chief. “Both the forward-thinking Honda Clarity and class-leading Honda CR-V are prime examples of how Honda innovates with buyers in mind, and makes advanced technology features that are both easy to use and accessible beyond high priced luxury vehicles.”

The Honda Clarity series was recognized by Edmunds’ editors for its leading-edge approach to electrified powertrain technology: “With options including pure electric, plug-in hybrid and hydrogen fuel cell models, the 2018 Honda Clarity provides unmatched flexibility when it comes to alternative fuel choices, and proves that innovative design can push the industry further toward a future using renewable energy.”

The experts at Edmunds praised the 2018 CR-V for its packaging, efficiency and innovation, saying “the 2018 Honda CR-V offers advanced driver assistance technologies and active safety features at an affordable price point, a rarity among SUVs. Coupled with other outstanding features such as a deftly balanced ride and handling, class-leading fuel economy ratings, and a large and clever storage space, the CR-V is a winner.”

Honda Canada Celebrates 20 Years of Best-Selling Civic with New SE Trim

JANUARY 2018

Source: https://www.honda.ca/newsdetails/nca/en/news/release/Honda-Canada-Celebrates-20-Years-of-BestSelling-Civic-with-New-SE-Trim

Markham, ON (January 11, 2018) – Honda Canada adds a Special Edition (SE) sedan trim to the already diverse Civic lineup to celebrate the nameplate’s 20 years as best-selling car in Canada, with an MSRP of $22,390. The Civic is a key pillar to Honda Canada’s success and accounts for nearly 40 percent of the brand’s annual sales. The Honda Civic is proudly built at the company’s manufacturing facility in Alliston, Ontario – by Canadians, for Canadians.

“The Civic embodies the challenging spirit of Honda and our commitment to delivering innovative products of the highest quality, durability and value. We are thankful for and deeply humbled by the loyalty and trust that our customers have placed in Honda and the Civic in the past 20 years,” said Jean Marc Leclerc, Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Honda Canada Inc. “The 20-year success of the Civic has led to the organic growth of a passionate and dedicated ‘Civic Nation’; a community made up of Canadians from all walks of life, connected by their common love of the Civic.”

The Civic is Honda’s longest-running automotive nameplate and its highest selling model globally. Its Canadian introduction came in 1973 when the Civic was heralded for its refined driving dynamics, quality construction and world-class fuel efficiency, despite selling only 747 units the first year. The revolutionary CVCC (Compound Vortex Controlled Combustion) engine debuted in Civic and cemented Honda’s place in history as a leader in powertrain innovation.

Over the course of 10 generations, the Civic has continuously evolved to meet the changing needs of Honda customers in North America and around the world, and has consistently set the bar for fuel efficiency, driving performance and design innovation in an affordable compact-class vehicle.

 

The first Civic – a three-door model – was built on Canadian soil at Honda of Canada Mfg. (HCM) in 1988 and the nameplate has never left. Now, HCM serves as the global lead plant for the tenth generation Civic model and more than five million Civics have been built at the Alliston facility.

“Being built at our Canadian manufacturing facility for 30 years and achieving this remarkable 20-year sales milestone has certainly cemented the Civic’s importance in Canada,” continued Leclerc. “The Civic’s longstanding Canadian production history is a direct reflection of the knowledge and experience of the more than 4,000 highly-skilled manufacturing associates at HCM.”

The Special Edition trim was developed in celebration of the Civic’s 20-year sales dominance and is intended to build upon the nameplate’s perfect marriage of styling, performance and packaging, by offering features Civic buyers want, including 16” aluminum-alloy wheels, leather steering wheel, Smart Entry with push button start, remote engine start, rear lip spoiler and a unique ‘SE’ emblem.

Honda Civic quick facts
• The Civic nameplate launched in Canada in 1973, selling 747 units in its first year.
• More than 1,286,000 Civics were sold in Canada in the past 20 years.
• Cumulative Canadian sales of Civic since 1973 reached 2,045,169 in December 2017.
• The Civic has been Canada’s best-selling passenger car for 20 consecutive years.
• Production of the Civic (three-door) began in 1988 at Honda of Canada Mfg. (HCM) in Alliston, Ontario.
• To date, more than five million Civics have been built at Honda’s manufacturing facility in Canada.
• More than 85 percent of all Civics sold in Canada in 2017 were built in Canada.
• In 2015, HCM became the global lead plant for the tenth generation Honda Civic, marking the first time a global lead plant had been located outside of Japan.
• Generation recap:
o 1st: 1973 – 1979 / Hatchback
o 2nd: 1980 – 1983 / Hatchback (1980), Sedan (1981), Wagon (1981)
o 3rd: 1984 – 1987 / Hatchback, Sedan, Wagon
o 4th: 1988 – 1991 / Hatchback, Sedan, Wagon, CRX
o 5th: 1992 – 1995 / Hatchback, Sedan, Coupe (1993)
o 6th: 1996 – 2000 / Hatchback, Sedan, Coupe
o 7th: 2001 – 2005 / Sedan, Coupe, Hatchback (2003)
o 8th: 2006 – 2011 / Sedan, Coupe
o 9th: 2012 – 2015 / Sedan, Coupe
o 10th: 2016 – Current / Sedan, Coupe, Hatchback (2016), Type-R (2017)