Category Archives: NEWS

December Sales Promotions

Limited time lease offer available through Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS), to qualified retail customers on approved credit. Weekly payments include freight and PDI ($1,595), tire & environmental fee ($17.50), A/C charge ($100), and OMVIC fee ($10). Taxes, licence, insurance and registration are extra. ΩRepresentative weekly lease example: 2018 Civic LX Sedan 6MT (Model FC2E5JE) on a 60-month term with 260 weekly payments at 3.99% lease APR. Weekly payment is $62.82 with $0 down or equivalent trade-in and $240 total lease incentive included. Down payment, $0 security deposit and first weekly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $16,333.61. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. PPSA lien registration fee of $45.93 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.65, due at time of delivery are not included. For all offers: licence, insurance, PPSA, other taxes (including HST) and excess wear and tear are extra. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. Offers only valid for Ontario residents at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. Dealer may lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Colour availability may vary by dealer. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. Offers, prices and features subject to change without notice. See your Ontario Honda Dealer or visit HondaOntario.com for full details.

Limited time lease offer available through Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS), to qualified retail customers on approved credit. Weekly payments include freight and PDI ($1,725), tire & environmental fee ($17.50), A/C charge ($100), and OMVIC fee ($10). Taxes, licence, insurance and registration are extra. ΩRepresentative weekly lease example: 2018 CR-V LX 2WD CVT (Model RW1H3JES) on a 60-month term with 260 weekly payments at 3.99% lease APR. Weekly payment is $81.91 with $0 down or equivalent trade-in and $85 total lease incentive included. Down payment, $0 security deposit and first weekly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $21,296.57. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. PPSA lien registration fee of $45.93 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.65, due at time of delivery are not included. For all offers: licence, insurance, PPSA, other taxes (including HST) and excess wear and tear are extra. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. Offers only valid for Ontario residents at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. Dealer may lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Colour availability may vary by dealer. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. Offers, prices and features subject to change without notice. See your Ontario Honda Dealer or visit HondaOntario.com for full details.

 

 

Honda CR-V Honoured as Motor Trend 2018 SUV of the Year

  • Motor Trend hails Honda CR-V as “supreme example of calm, confident composure that delivers in all categories”
  • Previous generation CR-V named 2015 SUV of the Year by Motor Trend
  • Every new Honda CR-V sold in Canada is built in Canada

Image of 2018 CR-V parked on road at night
MARKHAM, ON., November 28, 2017 – Motor Trend has named the ever-popular Honda CR-V as its 2018 SUV of the Year. The 2018 CR-V, which is the second model year of the completely reimagined fifth-generation of Honda’s compact SUV, beat out 25 contenders in an exhaustive evaluation by 11 of Motor Trend’s top editors, writers and testers. The refreshed fourth-generation Honda CR-V previously took home Motor Trend 2015 SUV of the Year honours.

“The 2018 Motor Trend award is a testament to the highly-skilled and dedicated Honda associates at our manufacturing plants across North America, including our team at Honda of Canada Manufacturing in Alliston, Ontario,” said Jean Marc Leclerc, Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Honda Canada. “Every new Honda CR-V sold in Canada is built right here in Canada, for Canadians, by Canadians.”

Calling it “the swankiest interior ever seen on the CR-V”, Motor Trend chose the CR-V because Honda paid attention to a wide range of details including advancement in design, safety performance features, engineering excellence, efficiency and value. To be eligible for the Motor Trend SUV of the Year award, a vehicle must be “all-new” or “substantially upgraded” and have been on sale within twelve months from the previous November.

The 2018 Honda CR-V is manufactured at three Honda plants in North America; Alliston, Ontario, East Liberty, Ohio, and Greensburg, Indiana. Its 1.5-liter turbocharged engine and automatic transmission are manufactured by Honda in Anna, Ohio and Russells Point, Ohio, respectively.

HONDA CR-V IS THE 2018 MOTOR TREND SUV OF THE YEAR

27 November, 2017 Motor Trend Staff Words and Photos, Michael Shaffer Photos

Source: http://www.motortrend.ca/en/news/honda-cr-v-2018-suv-of-the-year/

The quiet achiever: outright excellence in the industry’s most competitive segment

Whether it’s a car, truck, or SUV, the winners of Motor Trend’s Golden Calipers tend to fall into two categories. There are the dashing, dazzling disruptors such as Nissan’s GT-R or Tesla’s Model S. Then there are the quiet achievers: mass-market vehicles with thoughtful engineering and design, rigorous attention to detail, and a deeply intuitive understanding of the demands and desires of the customer. The 2018 Motor Trend SUV of the Year, the Honda CR-V, falls into the latter camp—a supreme example of calm, confident composure that delivers in all categories.

“Honda made sure it kept its crown jewel ahead of the field by paying attention to a wide range of details,” Detroit editor Alisa Priddle said. “Others might excel in certain fields, but others don’t put the whole package together the way the CR-V does.”

This is the second CR-V to take home the calipers in the 20-year history of the award: A thorough rework and refresh of the previous CR-V platform was enough to garner the 2015 SUV of the Year title, narrowly edging out Jeep’s Cherokee to take the win. Now, three years later, the comprehensively redesigned CR-V has bested another sporty European—this time Alfa Romeo’s surprisingly accomplished Stelvio—by just one vote.

Against 23 contenders, the 2018 Honda CR-V is a worthy winner. Here’s why.

ADVANCEMENT IN DESIGN

Like every new Honda launched in America in recent years, the new CR-V looks bigger and more substantial than the model it replaces, and that perception is reinforced by exterior styling that is a touch heavy-handed in places. Nevertheless, the CR-V is mercifully free of the riotous mess of lines and surfaces that blights the sheetmetal of some contemporary Japanese crossovers, relying instead on bolder graphic elements such as the grille and taillights to establish its identity. But in a field that boasted some beautifully styled SUVs, most notably the Volvo XC60 and V90 Cross Country and the aforementioned Alfa, it’s fair to say the Honda’s exterior wasn’t among the leaders when the judges’ discussion turned to design.

Inside, it’s a different story. “This is about the swankiest interior ever seen on the CR-V,” technical director Frank Markus said. Apart from some reflections on the instrument panel and some obviously fake wood, it’s carefully executed, with the high-mounted PRNDL gate, climate and audio controls, and infotainment screen within easy reach even for drivers of modest stature. Additional controls on the steering wheel are unobtrusive yet intuitive to use. “The overall design is logical and high-tech, and it feels loaded,” editor-in-chief Ed Loh said.

More important, the CR-V’s cabin is also supremely functional, with a ton of storage space up front in the doors and center console. The rear doors open wide, ensuring easy entry and exit to a rear seat that offers legroom and headroom aplenty, even for adults. Vents in the center console direct air to rear-seat passengers, and two USB charging ports keep their devices charged. At the rear, a low load floor and square dimensions help deliver a class-leading 39.2 cubic feet of cargo space with the rear seats up. And the CR-V is still one of only a handful of SUVs in the segment to offer the ability to lower the 60/40 split rear seat via levers in the load space area. It is a masterpiece of packaging, a true accomplishment in the compact SUV space.

ENGINEERING EXCELLENCE

The eye doesn’t lie: The 2017 CR-V is bigger than the previous model—longer and taller overall, with a longer wheelbase. But the scales also tell an intriguing truth. Although you get more CR-V, it weighs 113 pounds (51 kg) less, which helps both handling and efficiency.

Two engines are available, both of which drive through a continuously variable transmission. The entry-level CR-V LX is powered by the 184-hp, 180-lb-ft 2.4-liter naturally aspirated inline-four carried over from the previous generation. New for the 2018 EX, EX-L, and Touring CR-V models is a 1.5-liter turbocharged inline-four that develops 190 hp and 179 lb-ft.

Offering two engines with essentially identical outputs might seem a little odd, but there’s a method in Honda’s madness. Carrying over the 2.4-liter engine enables the entry-level LX model to be priced at just under $25,000 USD. For a $2,750 USD premium the new 1.5-liter turbo delivers its peak power at lower revs and peak torque across a much broader range than the naturally aspirated one, delivering noticeably better drivability, performance, and fuel economy. The 2018 CR-V Touring is not only 0.8 second quicker to 60 mph than the previous model but is also about 8 percent more fuel efficient around town, according to the EPA numbers. Our Real MPG figures show a 22.3 (10.5 L/100km) percent gain on the highway.

On the road, the CR-V chassis is consistent and predictable; it doesn’t do anything that will surprise you. That’s not to say it’s boring to drive. The steering is light but accurate and the ride tightly controlled, keeping the CR-V confidently planted through corners. The CVT works beautifully with the new 1.5-liter turbocharged four-banger, keeping the engine humming right where the torque curve is fattest to ensure good throttle response. “I’m impressed by how quickly this Honda is capable of going down a canyon road,” associate editor Scott Evans said. And on the high-speed oval, executive editor Mark Rechtin found the CR-V planted and stable at 115 mph (185 km/h)—not that you’ll ever need to go that fast, but it’s an excellent measure of chassis engineering.

Although impact harshness is well-suppressed, tire noise seeping into the cabin—a consistent bugbear with Hondas—is intrusive on some surfaces. And without lockable AWD or hill-descent control, the CR-V is definitely a soft-roader, though the AWD versions cope well with rutted, low-traction surfaces, thanks to a system that sends up to 40 percent of torque to the rear wheels.

EFFICIENCY

The entry-level CR-V LX matches the previous generation’s EPA-rated fuel economy, at 25–26/31–32 mpg (9.4-9/7.6-7.3 L/100km) city/highway with front- and all-wheel drive. Although one of the lighter SUVs among this year’s contenders, the fully loaded CR-V Touring nevertheless weighs 3,481 pounds (1,579 kg) and has a relatively large frontal area for a 1.5-liter engine to deal with, even one with a turbocharger. The Touring’s 27/33 mpg (8.7/7.1 L/100km) city/highway EPA rating is therefore impressive. Our Real MPG test results fall behind the EPA in the city and combined but outperform EPA’s highway rating.

SAFETY

When it comes to passive safety—the stuff that protects you during a crash—the CR-V has scored a solid five-star safety rating from NHTSA. And in terms of active safety—the stuff that can help you avoid a crash in the first place—the CR-V’s Honda Sensing driver-assistance system, which includes lane keeping assist, active cruise control, and collision prevention and is fitted to all but the base LX model, leads the segment.

Honda Sensing is easy to use and effective. The lane keeping assist function drew particular praise for being one of the few to infer a right edge of the road without needing a painted white line and for its ability to activate independently of active cruise control. Road test editor Chris Walton reckoned it to be perhaps the best lane keeping system available short of Tesla’s.

Evans was equally impressed. “It’s seriously impressive, especially for the price,” he said of Honda Sensing. “This is one of the most advanced driver-assistance systems on the market, and you can get it in an everyday family crossover.”

VALUE

With prices ranging from just under $25,000 USD for a front-drive LX to $34,735 USD for the top Touring AWD model, the CR-V crash-tackles America’s most competitive market segment. No matter which version you choose, Honda delivers a lot of compact SUV for your money.

Standard equipment levels are high. Volume-selling EX models, which start at $27,735 USD for a front-drive version and $1,300 USD more for the all-wheel-drive variant, come equipped with smart entry locking, a 7.0-inch touchscreen, and, of course, the deeply impressive Honda Sensing safety system.

PERFORMANCE OF INTENDED FUNCTION

Offering a compelling mix of fun and functionality, value and versatility, comfort and connectivity across a range of body styles and price points, today’s compact SUVs are attracting everyone from first-time car buyers to cost-conscious families to empty nesters. This broad appeal is why demand for compact SUVs has exploded over the past decade, with U.S. sales zooming from 1.5 million units in 2010 to nearly double that amount last year—and still climbing.

With the CR-V, Honda took aim right at the heart of this white-hot segment—and hit a bull’s eye. “If you’re buying a family crossover, I’m not sure why you’d consider anything other than the Honda CR-V,” features editor Christian Seabaugh said. “It checks all the boxes.”

It’s clear that Honda sweats the details. The CR-V is not just roomy, well-built, and well-equipped. It’s also thoughtfully conceived and executed. It has space for your stuff. It won’t punish you at the pump. It keeps you safe on the road. It’s packed with features at an affordable price. It’s even fun to drive when you want it to be. And it’s made in the U.S. and Canada to boot. “Overall, it’s the best in one of the toughest classes around,” Loh said. “That’s saying something.”

You bet. That’s saying the new Honda CR-V is good enough to make it Motor Trend’s 2018 SUV of the Year.

Car Review: 2018 Honda Accord 1.5T

The redesigned, 10th-generation Accord is easily the best family sedan from Honda in more than a decade.

by DAVID BOOTH
November 15th, 2017
Source: http://driving.ca/honda/accord/reviews/road-test/car-review-2018-honda-accord-1-5t

2018 Honda Accord

  • A vastly improved Honda Accord
  • Pros Turbocharged engine, interesting exterior, stylish interior, excellent chassis
  • Cons Over cautious driver’s aids, wimpy steering wheel heater
  • Value for money Good
  • What would I change? Healthier steering wheel and seat warmers
  • How I would spec it? Despite the adequacy of the base 1.5L engine, I think I’d still move up to the 2.0L just to get the more traditional 10-speed automatic transmission

 

2018 Honda Accord 1.5T

One of the backhanded compliments often foisted on mainstream automobiles, like Honda’s Accord, is that they’re so reliable they’re boring – the implication that dependability must, perforce, always preclude passion.

Well, I’ve got some news for you. My dear old dad still accords about his long-gone 1990, uhm, Accord EX-R top of place in his storied automotive pantheon. Considering that said 60-year collection — he just turned 90-years-young this last Friday — consisted of such luxury liners as a Lincoln Zephyr, such stalwarts as the 1964 Chevy Biscayne and quirks as one of the few Ford Taunus’ ever to make Canadian shores, that’s quite an accomplishment.

Yes, it was reliable – in its 15-year tenure in the Booth family, it needed but an oxygen sensor and a CV joint to run as smooth as a top for 200,000+ kilometres – but that alone cannot account for the soft spot he retains for the boxy little Honda almost two decades since it passed from his hands to my son’s.

2018 Honda Accord 1.5T

What he remembers is a solidity of purpose and chassis, the first necessary for reliable transport for his family of four, the latter imperturbable stability whenever my mom got behind the wheel. My dear old mother would have visions of doom and gloom whenever anyone else drove more than 10 km/h over the speed limit, but then made like Mario Andretti as soon as she got behind the wheel. My dad also loved the little white sedan because it was sophisticated – hey, it came with an audio equalizer – stylish and, this might surprise those raised on a steady diet of looking down upon Asian family sedans, he found it stupendously luxurious.

Which means that he’d love the new 2018 Accord 1.5T Touring. For one thing, that seemingly too small — only 1.5 litres in a car that weighs the better part of 1,500 kilograms — engine is plenty peppy. Like the new Civic, this tiniest of four-bangers is turbocharged, in this guise sufficiently producing 192 horsepower and the exact same number of torque. It’s an efficient little beast, especially mated to the continuously variable transmission, stout enough for more than ample acceleration; it feels noticeably more powerful than the normally-aspirated, 2.4-litre four-cylinder it replaces, and is an completely different league that the little 2.2L four that powered my dad’s old Accord.

Yet, it’s frugal enough to all but match the Transsport Canada’s fuel economy rating — rated at 6.8 L/100 kilometres, I achieved 6.9 — on the highway despite my 120 km/h cruising speed. I couldn’t match the overall 7.6 L/100 kilometres for combined urban and rural driving, but the car’s actual 8.2 overall average was nonetheless not too darn shabby. Dad would have liked the frugality; mom would have liked its pep.

There’s also that solidity of chassis that dad liked so much after his previously steady diet of soggy American sedans. An excellent combination of control and compliance, there’s more than enough road-holding for the intended purpose — it is, after all, a family sedan — and more importantly provides a ride not so very far removed from, say, an Audi A4. Even the steering, variable-ratio and electrically boosted, provides decent feedback. Oh, to be sure, things will get a little mushy if you start attacking on-ramps. But by that time, the baby seat has sent its precious cargo flying and Fido’s face — and ass — is probably plastered against the side window. At least for family sedans, there is such thing as enough.

The last item that would impress dear old dad is that the new Accord, in Touring guise at least, really is a cut above. Leather abounds and the top-of-the-line model is fairly loaded with gadgets and goodies. First among those has to be the huge screen for the infotainment system. Though not fully emulating a conventional tablet, it is icon based and pretty much a doddle to revise. Oh, the screen’s trip computer controls are diabolical, but then there’s an easy-to-use reset button on the steering wheel that makes mockery of the notion that every function is rendered easier with digitization.

Most impressively, however, is how the big screen has been integrated into the interior design. Not one of the fancier hideaway systems, the Accord’s fixed tablet nonetheless manages to look more integrated than similar systems in German luxury sedans. Yes, to all you brand whores, Honda does it better than Audi, BMW or Mercedes. Other highlights include a TFT-screened gauge set that looks surprisingly analogue and a bunch of onboard safety gear like blind-spot monitoring, lane-departure mitigation and adaptive cruise control. Oh, and the cabin is fairly silent, blessedly free of tire whine and little wind noise intruding on the cabin’s calm.

 

2018 Honda Accord 1.5T

Downsides are few. The heated steering wheel speaks to a fear of a McDonald’s-like scalding-steering wheel lawsuit. To say that its temperature boost is lukewarm is to give tepid a bad name. Seriously, even with bare hands, I could feel little warmth. And come to think of it, the seat warmers are a little wimpy too.

Those of especially long legs might also find there’s not enough front seat travel. As well, the aforementioned lane-departure system doesn’t feel particularly sophisticated wandering between the white lane lines like a drunk doing the perp march. Ditto the adaptive cruise control that performs a complete little-old-lady-from-Pasedena capitulation every time a car cuts into your lane while the computer is monitoring your speed. At least the Touring model’s adaptive cruise control has a Low-Speed Follow function that lets it crawl through traffic without the driver having to prompt it.

However, my biggest question were I shopping an Accord, especially the Touring model, would be whether to move up to the top-of-the-line 2.0-litre version – which replaces the previous generation’s 3.5-litre V6. Like the 1.5L, it too is turbocharged and boasts 252 horses and 273 lb.-ft. of torque.

2018 Honda Accord 1.5T

But that’s not the reason I’d opt for the bigger motor; I was plenty satisfied with the 1.5T. Rather, it is the 10-speed automatic transmission to which the bigger engine is connected that I covet. You see, while the CVT works well in moderate driving and in it Econ mode, in Sport or accelerating hard onto an on-ramp, the CVT causes the 1.5L to drone on a little. It’s perhaps not a deal breaker, but the upgrade to more power and a regular transmission is but $3,000. As you’ve already spent $35,790 on a Touring Accord, an extra $3,000 probably shouldn’t be a roadblock to drivetrain happiness. It does, however, suck back an extra 1.5 L/100 kilometres, according to Transport Canada.

In the end, though, CVT and other minor foibles notwithstanding, the 2018 Accord is another area where dad and I — now that he, like all fathers, has gotten smarter with age — would now see eye-to-eye. He no longer drives, so I will take up the mantle of Accord worship in his stead. To wit: The 2018 is the best Accord in many a year, perhaps even since that fourth-generation beauty my dad loved so. Certainly, it’s head and shoulders above Honda’s most recent efforts.

As to whether it’s the best family sedan in the segment is a contention the Toyota Camry — also new for 2018 and equally dramatic in its improvement — would forcefully dispute. Nonetheless, the new Accord — 1.5L and 2.0L both — is the best family sedan from Honda in well more than a decade.

November Sales Promotions

Limited time lease offers available through Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS), to qualified retail customers on approved credit. Weekly payments include freight and PDI ($1,595), tire & environmental fee ($17.50), A/C charge ($100), and OMVIC fee ($10). Taxes, licence, insurance and registration are extra. ΩRepresentative weekly lease example: 2018 Civic LX Sedan 6MT (Model FC2E5JE) on a 60-month term with 260 weekly payments at 3.99% lease APR. Weekly payment is $62.82 with $0 down or equivalent trade-in and $240 total lease incentive included. Down payment, $0 security deposit and first weekly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $16,333.61. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. PPSA lien registration fee of $45.93 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.65, due at time of delivery are not included. For all offers: licence, insurance, PPSA, other taxes (including HST) and excess wear and tear are extra. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. Offers only valid for Ontario residents at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. Dealer may lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Colour availability may vary by dealer. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. Offers, prices and features subject to change without notice. See your Ontario Honda Dealer or visit HondaOntario.com for full details.

 

Limited time lease offers available through Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS), to qualified retail customers on approved credit. Weekly payments include freight and PDI ($1,725), tire & environmental fee ($17.50), A/C charge ($100), and OMVIC fee ($10). Taxes, licence, insurance and registration are extra. ΩRepresentative weekly lease example: 2018 CR-V LX 2WD CVT (Model RW1H3JES) on a 60-month term with 260 weekly payments at 3.99% lease APR. Weekly payment is $81.91 with $0 down or equivalent trade-in and $85 total lease incentive included. Down payment, $0 security deposit and first weekly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $21,296.57. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. PPSA lien registration fee of $45.93 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.65, due at time of delivery are not included. For all offers: licence, insurance, PPSA, other taxes (including HST) and excess wear and tear are extra. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. Offers only valid for Ontario residents at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. Dealer may lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Colour availability may vary by dealer. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. Offers, prices and features subject to change without notice. See your Ontario Honda Dealer or visit HondaOntario.com for full details.

Test Drive: 2018 Honda Fit

BY CHRISTIAN WARDLAW, OCTOBER 18, 2017

Source: http://www.jdpower.com/cars/articles/new-car-reviews/test-drive-2018-honda-fit

2018 Honda Fit Sport front quarter left photo

Introduction
Intending to enhance its emotional appeal and driving character, Honda has refreshed the 2018 Fit.

Revised styling, reworked suspension and steering, and refinements in terms of noise, vibration, and harshness are a part of the list of updates to the Fit, along with new driver-assistance, collision-avoidance, and infotainment technologies. A new Sport trim level debuts, too, slotting above the base LX and below the EX and EX-L trims.

Honda Factory Performance (HFP) has also created a new accessory package for the 2018 Fit. Available for Sport, EX, and EX-L versions of the car, it includes a lowered sport suspension, along with several cosmetic enhancements that give the Fit a racy character.

Naturally, the 2018 Fit retains the utility that has made it a standout in the subcompact segment, where Honda claims it accounts for half of all retail sales to the typical consumer.

Styling and Design
In an effort to make the Fit appear wider and lower, Honda has restyled the front and rear bumpers. A new grille is also included, and the Sport trim level adds gloss-black 16-in. aluminum wheels, a front spoiler, side sill trim, and a rear diffuser panel. Orange accents further distinguish the Fit Sport, along with fog lights and a chrome tailpipe finisher.

Inside, the Fit is largely unchanged. Sport trim has orange contrast stitching on the seats and manual gearshift knob, and the EX-L trim continues to offer leather seats—an upscale touch that is unusual in the subcompact segment. Added sound-deadening material and thicker windshield and front quarter window glass is claimed to quiet the Fit’s cabin.

Form follows function with the Honda Fit. Shaped like a doorstop, this car packs maximum interior space and utility into as diminutive an exterior package as is possible. Inside, a greater sense of style and flair gives the Fit near class-leading levels of refinement, yet practicality rules, as is evident from the pop-out cupholder in front of the leftmost dashboard air vent.

What makes the Fit particularly special is its rear “Magic Seat” design. Owners can flip the bottom cushion up to carry tall items, or the seat can be folded down to transform the trunk’s 16.6 cu. ft. of cargo room into 52.7 cu. ft. of cube-shaped space. Also, by removing the front-seat head restraints, they fold flat creating a lumpy but comparatively comfortable place to sleep.

Features and Controls
Upgrading from LX to Sport trim adds the previously discussed cosmetic enhancements to the 2018 Fit, as well as a new Display Audio infotainment system with better sound. The Fit Sport also has a few more functions for its driver information display.

The next rung on the trim ladder is EX, which is visually distinguished from the LX by its machine-finished 16-in. aluminum wheels. This trim also adds Honda Sensing safety technology, LaneWatch right-side blind-spot monitoring, power sunroof, keyless entry with push-button engine start, satellite radio, and a handful of other conveniences.

For leather seats, heated up front, the EX-L is the right choice. This version of the car also includes heated side mirrors with turn signal indicators, and it comes only with a continuously variable transmission.

Simplicity has its rewards, and operating a Honda Fit is easier than ever, thanks to the return of a volume knob for the stereo. Front-seat comfort could be improved. It would be nice to get a separate thigh bolster for improved driver positioning, some padding on the door panel armrests, and an armrest between the front seats. The rear seats are downright huge for such a small car, offering plenty of room for two lanky adults.

Safety and Technology
Perhaps the most significant news associated with the 2018 Fit is the addition of Honda Sensing to all trim levels, either as standard or as optional equipment, and in conjunction with both the manual gearbox and the CVT.

Honda Sensing includes adaptive cruise control, forward-collision warning, automatic emergency braking, lane-departure warning, lane-keeping assist, and a system called Road Departure Mitigation, which tries to prevent the car from unintentionally leaving the pavement. Combined with a standard reversing camera and the LaneWatch system, all that’s missing from the Fit is a blind-spot warning system with rear cross-traffic alert.

In crash testing, the 2017 Fit excelled in federal government crash testing, earning impressive marks in most assessments from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). In 2015 and 2016, the Fit received an “Acceptable” rating for small overlap frontal-impact protection, and the 2017 Fit was not rated in this regard, suggesting that a structural change may have been made. Honda has further reinforced the Fit’s chassis for 2018, though, including areas at each leading corner of the passenger cell.

Also for 2018, Honda adds a new version of its Display Audio infotainment system to the Fit. Standard in Sport, EX, and EX-L trims, this system features improved graphics, a stereo volume knob, and smartphone-projection supporting Apple CarPlay and Android Auto formats. Additional highlights include text-messaging support, Pandora integration, and HondaLink subscription services. These models also benefit from quick-charge USB ports.

Move up to EX trim and satellite radio is standard. As an exclusive option for EX-L trims, an embedded navigation system is available complete with real-time traffic and voice-recognition technology.

Driving Impressions
Every 2018 Fit is equipped with a 1.5-liter 4-cylinder engine. With the manual transmission, it is rated to generate 130 horsepower. With the CVT, the horsepower figure is 128. Though the car weighs no more than 2,648 lbs., this level of output is adequate, and no more.

Manual shifting makes best use of the power, and is the most gratifying. Honda knows how to engineer a slick stick, and the Fit is no exception. Comparatively, the CVT drones in an aurally unpleasant way, making the car seem slower because the amount of noise is not commensurate with the sensory perception of acceleration. Paddle shifters are provided for Sport, EX, and EX-L trims, but during short jaunts in a Los Angeles suburb proved somewhat effective.

The good news is that you hear less engine racket. Road and wind noise are better attenuated, too. Some on-center uncertainty remains in the electric steering, but it is slightly improved, and the ride and handling equation is better than ever. Especially with the manual transmission, the 2018 Fit flits about town with a nimble cheerfulness.

Don’t expect any extra fun from the Sport trim level. Mechanically, it is identical to the EX, right down to its 16-in. wheels and 185/55 all-season tires. Instead, consider the new HFP accessory package for its sport suspension tuning. A brief run down a canyon road in a Fit Sport HFP showed that the components transform the car’s handling capabilities. Now all it needs is more aggressive rubber. And a turbocharger. And better-bolstered seats to keep you anchored behind the steering wheel.

Conclusion
Honda has no intention of relinquishing its dominance over the subcompact car segment, and this year’s list of improvements to the Fit should certainly ensure the model’s continued success.

Of course, it helps that other companies are dropping out to focus on more profitable subcompact crossover SUVs, perhaps most notably Ford, which isn’t planning to renew the Fiesta in the U.S. market.

If you’re thinking that’s a good idea, Honda’s got you covered. The company’s HR-V is basically a crossover version of the Fit, offering similar utility and available all-wheel drive at a higher price.

Pay In 6 Installments when you buy and install a qualifying new set of cold-weather tires and rims before November 15th, 2017†

†On approved credit. Offer not available to Quebec residents. Minimum purchase amount is $465. Offer valid on the purchase of both tires and rims only – not valid on the purchase of tires alone. Tires and rims must be installed between September 15th and November 15th, 2017. Offer only applicable to certain tire brands and sizes, while supplies last. ‡Should you find a lower advertised price within thirty (30) days before or after the purchase of qualifying tires from a participating Ontario Honda Dealer, present the Ontario Honda Dealer where you purchased or intend to purchase qualifying tires with proof of the advertised price and they will match the lower price. Offer does not apply to quotes or advertised prices from outside Ontario, online auction sites, wholesalers, online retailers that have no physical stores in Ontario, close out/liquidation/clearance sales, advertising errors or misprints or restricted offers. Subject to stock availability. Qualifying tires must be purchased and installed at a participating Ontario Honda Dealer. Advertised item must: (i) be an in-stock brand, excluding Bridgestone, be of the same brand, size, model, sidewall, speed and load rating; (ii) be sold through an authorized retailer located in Ontario; and (iii) be in Canadian dollars. Lowest Price Guarantee does not apply to costs associated with labour, valve stems, mounting/balancing, disposal fees and taxes. Some restrictions apply. Offer subject to change or cancellation without notice. Ask your Ontario Honda Dealer for details. Offers available at participating Ontario Honda dealers. Some conditions and restrictions apply. Please see your participating Ontario Honda Dealer for full details. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice.

Completely Redesigned 2018 Honda Accord to Arrive At Dealerships This Fall

Three advanced new powertrains, including Accord’s first-ever turbocharged engines, a new 10-speed automatic transmission and a third-generation two-motor hybrid system. Elegant and modern exterior detailing compliments the Accord’s new, more dynamic design

MARKHAM, Ont., October 6, 2017 – The completely reimagined 2018 Honda Accord is set to arrive at Canadian dealerships on October 27, 2017 with a Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) starting at $26,490 and topping out on the Touring trim (2.0T) at $38,790. In recreating Accord for its 10th generation, Honda designers and engineers sought to convey “absolute confidence” in every element of design and performance.

“Building on the bedrock character of Accord – its outstanding quality, fuel efficiency, packaging and sophisticated driving dynamics – the 10th-generation Accord injects a new level of emotional appeal and premium quality” said, Jean Marc Leclerc, Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Honda Canada Inc.

The 10th generation 2018 Accord takes an entirely new approach to performance with its two new direct-injected VTEC Turbo® 4-cylinder engines with dual VTC – a 1.5-liter 16-valve inline-4 and a 2.0-liter 16-valve DOHC inline-4. Both new turbocharged engines produce peak torque across a broad range of engine speed (RPM), delivering smooth and virtually lag-free power for exceptional throttle response and power delivery in all driving conditions.

Upscale and sophisticated, confident and distinctive, youthful and sporty – the 10th generation Accord design strongly advances the emotional and aspirational appeal of Accord. Designed to distinguish itself as a “class above” its competitors, the new Accord has a wider stance, lower roofline and a dramatically longer, lower hood to achieve improved dynamics, a more comfortable interior and a more dramatic presence.

All Accords feature the full suite of Honda Sensing® safety and driver-assistive technologies as standard equipment.

The 2018 Accord Hybrid’s third-generation i-MMD Two-motor hybrid system is a highly efficient powertrain that selects the optimal drive operation under a wide range of driving conditions to combine fun-to-drive performance with outstanding fuel efficiency.The new hybrid will arrive in early 2018.

MT CVT
LX $26,490 (1.5T) $27,790 (1.5T)
Sport $29,790(1.5T)

$32,790(2L)

$31,090 (1.5T)

$34,090 (2L)

EX-L ———– $32,490 (1.5T)
Touring ———– $35,790 (1.5T)

$38,790 (2L)

 

About Honda
Honda Canada Inc. (HCI) was founded in 1969 and is the parent company for both Honda and Acura vehicle brands in Canada.  The company has produced more than 7.8 million cars and light trucks since 1986 at its two manufacturing facilities and builds engines at a third manufacturing plant in Alliston, Ontario.  Both manufacturing facilities are extremely flexible and currently build Honda Civic and CR-V models.  Honda Canada has invested more than $4.7 billion in Canada and each year it sources nearly $2.1 billion in goods and services from Canadian suppliers. Honda Canada has sold more than four million Honda and Acura passenger cars and light trucks in Canada.

Dramatically Redesigned 2018 Honda Accord Goes High-Tech

Popular midsized sedan packs turbo engines, 10-speed automatic, and an improved infotainment system

By Mike Monticello

October 2, 2017

Source: https://www.consumerreports.org/sedans/2018-honda-accord-first-drive-review/

*Note: U.S.A. Model shown*

2018 Honda Accord front driving

Radical revisions are rare in the popular midsized sedan segment. Yet the 2018 Honda Accord brings wholesale changes—from curvy, coupe-inspired styling to turbocharged engines—in what is a dramatic makeover for a perennial segment leader.

Consumer Reports applauds Honda for making advanced safety features, including forward-collision warning and automatic emergency braking, standard equipment across all Accord trims.

CR rented a top-shelf Touring model from Honda to gather our initial impressions. Clearly, Honda has evolved the traditionally conservative Accord, and the result appears to be as satisfying as ever. The new version starts arriving at dealers in mid-October.

One of the biggest changes to the Accord’s new mixture is the switch to turbocharged four-cylinder engines (a 1.5-liter version and a 2.0-liter version) and giving up on any V6 version.

We were impressed with the slickness of the 2.0-liter turbo, 10-speed automatic drivetrain from the moment we stepped on the accelerator pedal. Although you might miss the sound of the V6, this punchy turbo-four delivers strong, smooth power, yet stays refined, even when the engine is really pushed. The automatic transmission is smooth and responsive, and it delivers almost imperceptible shifts.

The 2.0-liter turbo-four (adapted from the Civic Type R) that puts out 252 hp replaces the lively and beloved 3.5-liter V6. This new engine is linked to an all-new 10-speed automatic transmission. Either engine type is available with a six-speed manual (a rarity these days) in the Sport trim. A four-cylinder hybrid will join the lineup in early 2018.

The smaller, 1.5-liter base engine produces 192 hp and is mated to a continuously variable transmission. We’ve seen this engine before, in the Civic and the CR-V. This is the most powerful base engine ever in an Accord. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates the Accord 1.5T at 33 mpg combined with the CVT, a 3-mpg improvement over the old engine.

This latest Accord skews to the athletic side among family sedans, and the steering’s weighty feel contributes to a solid, substantial handling experience. The Touring trim’s ride irons out bumpy roads, but considering it comes standard with two-mode adaptive suspension, we expected it to be a little more tied down. The standard 19-inch wheels on the Touring certainly didn’t help with its ride quality. Most Accords come with 17-inch wheels. A hushed cabin hasn’t been a Honda trademark, but we found that this one does a nice job muting the road, wind, and engine noise.

2018 Honda Accord interior

A prominent single-screen infotainment system replaces the dual-screen setup that infuriated us on higher-trim models of the outgoing Accord. It’s more user-friendly than before, featuring vivid, colorful graphics and the ability to rearrange icons—but there is still a learning curve for drivers. We appreciate getting knobs for audio volume and tuning. The new digital and analog instrument cluster reinforces the high-tech nature of the new car.

Most controls work well throughout the car, but we’re not fans of the push-button shifter in models with the 2.0-liter engines. It’s the same setup we’ve disliked in other Honda and Acura products. It’s unintuitive, and we’ve found it to be a particular nuisance when parking or trying to make three-point turns. Luckily, the 1.5-liter/CVT combo—the car most consumers will buy—comes with a traditional gear selector.

The new Accord got lower and wider, so getting in and out requires more ducking. There is plenty of headroom and elbow room up front, plus wide and comfortable seats including four-way lumbar adjustment on the Touring version. Slide into the rear seat and you’re greeted with abundant legroom, though headroom is a bit limited, which could make it feel confining for taller folks. Honda says the cargo area is slightly larger than in the outgoing model.

The standard Honda Sensing suite of advanced safety systems includes forward-collision warning, automatic emergency braking, lane-keeping assist, adaptive cruise control, and auto high beams. Models with the manual transmission have automatic emergency braking, which some other automakers don’t provide. Unfortunately, blind-spot warning and rear cross-traffic alert are not part of the standard package, though they are available.

2018 Honda Accord rear.

Pricing begins at $23,570 for the 1.5T. If you want a manual transmission, you need to step up to the Sport at $25,780. The Accord with the more powerful 2.0-liter engine starts at $30,310, reaching $35,800 for the top Touring trim.

We’ll be buying a 2018 Honda Accord of our own when available this month. The 2.0L reaches market in November, with the hybrid following in early 2018. Make sure you check back to see how the new model stacks up against competitors after we put it through our full test regimen.

 

October Sales Promotions

 

Limited time offers available through Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS), to qualified retail customers on approved credit. Weekly payments include freight and PDI ($1,595), tire & environmental fee ($17.50), A/C charge ($100), and OMVIC fee ($10). Taxes, licence, insurance and registration are extra. ΩRepresentative weekly lease example: 2017 Civic LX Sedan 6MT (Model FC2E5HE) on a 60-month term with 260 weekly payments at 1.99% lease APR. Weekly payment is $55.72 with $0 down or equivalent trade-in and $475 total lease incentive included. Down payment, $0 security deposit and first weekly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $14,486.07. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. PPSA lien registration fee of $45.93 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.65, due at time of delivery are not included. ^$750 Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS) Honda Bonus is deducted from the negotiated price after taxes. Honda Bonus applies to retail customer lease or finance agreements through HFS for 2017 Civic Sedan and Coupe models concluded between October 3rd, 2017 and October 31st, 2017 at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. For all offers: licence, insurance, PPSA, other taxes (including HST) and excess wear and tear are extra. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. Offers only valid for Ontario residents at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer trade may be necessary. Colour availability may vary by dealer. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. Offers, prices and features subject to change without notice. See your Ontario Honda Dealer or visit HondaOntario.com for full details.

 

Limited time offers available through Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS), to qualified retail customers on approved credit. Weekly payments include freight and PDI ($1,725), tire & environmental fee ($17.50), A/C charge ($100), and OMVIC fee ($10). Taxes, licence, insurance and registration are extra. ΩRepresentative weekly lease example: 2017 CR-V LX 2WD CVT (Model RW1H3HES) on a 60-month term with 260 weekly payments at 3.99% lease APR. Weekly payment is $79.00 with $0 down or equivalent trade-in, $730 total lease incentive and $132 individual dealer contribution deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes. Down payment, $0 security deposit and first weekly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $20,539.89. 120,000 kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. PPSA lien registration fee of $45.93 and lien registering agent’s fee of $5.65, due at time of delivery are not included. ^$750 Honda Financial Services Inc. (HFS) Honda Bonus is deducted from the negotiated price after taxes. Honda Bonus applies to retail customer lease or finance agreements through HFS for 2017 CR-V models concluded between October 3rd, 2017 and October 31st, 2017 at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. For all offers: licence, insurance, PPSA, other taxes (including HST) and excess wear and tear are extra. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. Offers only valid for Ontario residents at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer trade may be necessary. Colour availability may vary by dealer. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. Offers, prices and features subject to change without notice. See your Ontario Honda Dealer or visit HondaOntario.com for full details.