Category Archives: NEWS

Myth or Fact? Honda Vehicles Are More Expensive to Insure

It’s a surprise when you purchase insurance for your new car, and not a particularly good one. You may not have thought to get a quote ahead of time; to check how much it will cost to insure your new Honda. When you do, you realize it’s more than you expected it to be.

It feels like it’s more than your Toyota was, or the Hyundai you had before that. And you might conclude that Honda vehicles are more expensive to insure…but are you wrong?

It’s a Myth

Let’s take a look at a direct comparison: a 2017 Honda Civic LX 4-door and a 2017 Toyota Corolla LE. Both cars are respectably equipped with convenience features, and are within a few hundred dollars in initial purchase price. How do the insurance quotes stack up?

A common car insurance comparison website, Kinetix.ca, is the basis for busting the myth. The quote uses the same background information for both cars – the driver information is the same, no discounts applied, same vehicle usage as commuter, and the same deductible and liability insurances.

What you see above are actual quote results. Your results will vary depending on your circumstances, and almost assuredly lower based on available discounts. The top four quotes all favour the Honda Civic with lower insurance costs. In fact, seven of eight quotes returned by Kinetix were lower for the Honda than the comparable Toyota!

It Isn’t Just the Civic Either…

The same insurance comparison is repeated for a comparable 2017 Honda CR-V 4WD and Toyota RAV4 AWD. The results come in the same. To be totally honest, the disparity is a little more also.

A 2017 Honda Accord EX 4-door rings in just slightly higher than the 2017 Toyota Camry EX-L but the difference is marginal. A 2015 Honda Odyssey LX is about 5 percent less than the 2015 Toyota Sienna LE.

Honda insurance prices aren’t just comparable – they are better than the direct competition in most cases!

Why Does My Insurance Seem Too High?

The question to ask is: what vehicle did you drive before? If you’re like most car buyers, you are relinquishing a vehicle that is four to six years old. As you might expect, insurance prices decrease as a vehicle gets older. You’ve simply become accustomed to paying for insurance on a car that’s not worth as much as it did when it was new.

Paying more for insurance on a new vehicle makes sense. In the event your vehicle is written off or damaged, an insurance company will need to pay more for repairs or compensation on a newer car. And in a few years, as your new Honda gets some ‘experience’ under its belts, the cost of insurance will begin to decrease.

2017 Honda Civic Type R: Full Throttle at Circuit Mont Tremblant

BY GABRIEL GÉLINAS

JULY 24, 2017

Source: http://www.guideautoweb.com/en/articles/43675/2017-honda-civic-type-r-full-throttle-at-circuit-mont-tremblant/

PHOTO: HONDA CANADA

MONT TREMBLANT, Quebec – Both icon and—until now—forbidden fruit, it’s no surprise that the Civic Type R is one of the most eagerly anticipated cars of the year. The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is the brand’s fastest and most powerful car, and it’s finally rolling into Canadian dealerships. It comes in either Championship White or Crystal Black Pearl and starts at $40,890.

My first encounter with the Civic Type R was in a dream setting, Circuit Mont Tremblant. Honda had retained the services of instructors to “guide” journalists as we acquainted ourselves with the car and I was pleasantly surprised to see Philippe Létourneau in the passenger seat next to me. As I had personally contributed to Philippe’s education back in the day at the Jim Russell Racing Driver School, the role reversal struck me as fun. All I had to do was hop in, select R mode on the centre console and push the car to the limit.

The 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine is fed by a turbocharged that delivers 23.2 psi of pressure. With 306 horsepower at 6500 rpm and 295 lb.-ft. of torque available between 2500 and 4500 rpm, the Type R launched itself into Turn One right out of the pits with impressive poise. Thrust isn’t relentless, but it’s quite sustained, especially in first, second and third gears thanks to the VTEC valve timing system and turbocharger.

The only available transmission is a six-speed manual whose shifter is remarkably precise. The clutch is as easy to engage as that of a conventional Civic. Once the Type R attacked the Devil’s Turn and then The Esses, it was clear that this would be no ordinary track test drive.

Although the Type R is front-wheel driven, there’s no noticeable torque effect in the steering wheel in flat-out acceleration, which is truly exceptional. This is owing to its dual-axis front suspension—the first being linked to the suspension itself and the second being linked to the steering. This unique design explains why the circuit’s corners had no effect whatsoever on the delivery of the power when exiting turns, helping guide the car on the ideal trajectory with millimetre precision.

Exceptional chassis dynamics
When coming out of The Esses, I shifted into fourth and fifth gear for Turn Six, then braked and downshifted for Turn Seven, which we took in fourth gear. This blind turn’s braking zone includes a slight bump before the entry point and another just before the apex, where the incline of the track becomes negative until the exit point of the turn. The Type R laughed in the face of all of that and headed toward Turn Eight, which we took in third.

As we exited this turn, which includes two apexes, Philippe recommended shifting into fourth and fifth before reaching the maximum rev limit. The result was beneficial, with the Type R gaining several kilometres/hour more on the long back straight. The car really stuck to the pavement in Turn Ten and the transition from the left side to the right side was smooth as silk for The Gulch and the climb toward the Bridge Turn. Next, it’s the Kink, Namerow and Paddock Bend before crossing the finish line and beginning another lap.

What did I learn from the Type R test drive at Circuit Mont Tremblant? This car has an exceptional chassis. It’s so good, in fact, that it could easily handle an additional 30 or 40 horsepower without needing too many modifications. And the car’s dynamics are absolutely fantastic. The reactions are always predictable and it’s a real pleasure to see how comfortable the Type R is on this very demanding—and unforgiving—circuit.

There are just two drawbacks. Braking is efficient with 13.8-inch ventilated discs and Brembo callipers in front, but the pedal travel is a little long. Also, the engine doesn’t pull as much in fourth and fifth gears as in first through third and the engine isn’t very loud: more decibels means more thrills. That’s it for the weaknesses. They are few and far between.

In closing, remember that this test drive was limited to the track, so I may have missed details about its handling or comfort on regular thoroughfares; that will have to be a topic for another day. On the circuit, however, the Type R delivered the goods with remarkable poise and exceptional dynamics.

I drove my family around in the new Honda Odyssey and discovered why it’s the greatest minivan ever made

Matthew DeBord     Jul. 18, 2017, 9:57 AM

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/honda-odyssey-review-2017-7/#power-sliding-doors-power-liftgate-seating-for-seven-enough-cargo-capacity-to-transport-half-a-youth-soccer-team-or-a-newly-formed-garage-band-yes-its-the-mighty-2018-honda-odyssey-fifth-generation-edition-built-in-alabama-usa-all-new-but-still-all-odyssey-1

*Note: U.S.A. Model shown*

Honda OdysseyThe finest in all the land. Matthew DeBord/BI

When it comes to minivans in the USA, it’s often viewed as a two-horse race: You’re either a Honda Odyssey family or a Toyota Sienna family.

The Odyssey, first rolled out in the mid-1990s, has a reputation for better engineering and superior driving dynamics, while the Sienna, arriving a little later, has a smushier ride and is perhaps made to last a bit longer.

You could think of the Odyssey as the BMW of minivans and the Sienna the Mercedes — and you are free to do so because the Germans don’t sell a minivan in the US.

What about Dodge-Chrysler, you might ask? Didn’t they invent the minivan? Yes, they did, and with the Chrysler Town and Country, discontinued in 2016 after 27 years, they had the Cadillac of minivans. They now sell the Pacifica, which has famously become a platform for Waymo’s self-driving technology (minivans have been losing out to SUVs for a decade, but, funny enough, Silicon Valley might stage a renaissance). Thus far, the vehicle has been a big hit.

We’re checking out the Sienna later this year, but we recently borrowed an all-new Odyssey and spent a week sampling one-half of the magnificent minivan duo.

Here’s what we thought of our absolutely jammed-packed-with-features $47,610 Elite trim-level test car. (The base LX is about $30,000.)

Power sliding doors. Power liftgate. Seating for seven. Enough cargo capacity to transport half a youth soccer team or a newly formed garage band. Yes, it’s the mighty 2018 Honda Odyssey, fifth-generation edition, built in Alabama, USA, all-new but still all Odyssey.

Power sliding doors. Power liftgate. Seating for seven. Enough cargo capacity to transport half a youth soccer team or a newly formed garage band. Yes, it's the mighty 2018 Honda Odyssey, fifth-generation edition, built in Alabama, USA, all-new but still all Odyssey.

Matthew DeBord/BI

 

Full disclosure: I’m a former Odyssey owner. I had a 2007 model, also in burgundy (“Deep Scarlet,” for 2018). My family of five laid waste to it, but we loved it to pieces. So I’ve counted myself as member of Odyssey Nation, but I came to the new 2018 with objectivity.

Full disclosure: I'm a former Odyssey owner. I had a 2007 model, also in burgundy ("Deep Scarlet," for 2018). My family of five laid waste to it, but we loved it to pieces. So I've counted myself as member of Odyssey Nation, but I came to the new 2018 with objectivity.

Matthew DeBord/BI

We will assess the design by starting in perhaps an odd location …

We will assess the design by starting in perhaps an odd location ...

Matthew DeBord/BI

… the back. Notice that line of chrome, slipping down slightly on its way to the rear. For the previous generation of the vehicle, Honda used a bold “lightning bolt” zigzag, after the previous generation’s line was straight. This was controversial, and the element has been dialed back for the 2018 model.

... the back. Notice that line of chrome, slipping down slightly on its way to the rear. For the previous generation of the vehicle, Honda used a bold "lightning bolt" zigzag, after the previous generation's line was straight. This was controversial, and the element has been dialed back for the 2018 model.

Matthew DeBord/BI

The idea with the original Z shape was to create a slightly larger window for the third-row occupants. Otherwise, Honda has flashed up the Odyssey a bit with a stylish, symmetrical curving indentation that flows across the vehicles flanks. It’s attractive, but fans of the good old boxy body style from two generations ago will probably be miffed, just as they were by the lightning bolt with the fourth gen.

I consider myself a third-gen partisan, but that’s also like being a fan of the C3 Corvette — the “Boogie Nights”-era Vette — and expecting the classic design to never, ever change. The G3 Odyssey was perfect, but in many ways the G5 version lives up to the name better.

From the front, the presentation of chrome is more concentrated and connected more aggressively to the headlights. The trick with minivans obviously is to prevent the front fascia from appearing to blocky and panel-van-like. Honda has been good at this.

From the front, the presentation of chrome is more concentrated and connected more aggressively to the headlights. The trick with minivans obviously is to prevent the front fascia from appearing to blocky and panel-van-like. Honda has been good at this.

Matthew DeBord/BI

A closer look.

A closer look.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Not much you can do about the rear end. It’s a van. The liftgate is huge but …

Not much you can do about the rear end. It's a van. The liftgate is huge but ...

Matthew DeBord/BI

… when opened (it’s power-assisted) the Odyssey’s cargo capacity is simply vast, better than most SUVs due to the sunken well behind the rear wheels.

... when opened (it's power-assisted) the Odyssey's cargo capacity is simply vast, better than most SUVs due to the sunken well behind the rear wheels.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Fold down the third-row seats …

Fold down the third-row seats ...

Matthew DeBord/BI

… and you’ve got enough space to travel in style. I had a tough time finding anything big enough to put in there to show the scale.

... and you've got enough space to travel in style. I had a tough time finding anything big enough to put in there to show the scale.

Matthew DeBord/BI

All righty — so let’s face facts. We’re dealing with the minivan here. It’s a large rectangular box with wheels. But let’s give it to Honda for adding that groovy spoiler to the rear roofline.

All righty — so let's face facts. We're dealing with the minivan here. It's a large rectangular box with wheels. But let's give it to Honda for adding that groovy spoiler to the rear roofline.

Matthew DeBord/BI

There are quite a few controls on the fob. But you need a lot of control with a feature-packed beast like the Odyssey Elite: power liftgate, power sliding doors on both sides, remote start.

There are quite a few controls on the fob. But you need a lot of control with a feature-packed beast like the Odyssey Elite: power liftgate, power sliding doors on both sides, remote start.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Speaking of the power sliding doors, Honda uses a design that involves a track that runs along the van’s belt-line. The competing Toyota Sienna employs a “hanging” design that has the track up at the roofline.

Speaking of the power sliding doors, Honda uses a design that involves a track that runs along the van's belt-line. The competing Toyota Sienna employs a "hanging" design that has the track up at the roofline.

Matthew DeBord/BI

I could spend some time discussing the dimensions of the interior, but it all boils down to one word: ROOMY. Everywhere you look, space, space, and more space. Seven adults can be quite comfortable in this vehicle, and you really can’t say that about even modern three-row SUVs.I get in and out of low-slung sports car for a living, and the Odyssey ease of ingress and egress were a welcome change.

I could spend some time discussing the dimensions of the interior, but it all boils down to one word: ROOMY. Everywhere you look, space, space, and more space. Seven adults can be quite comfortable in this vehicle, and you really can't say that about even modern three-row SUVs.I get in and out of low-slung sports car for a living, and the Odyssey ease of ingress and egress were a welcome change.

Matthew DeBord/BI

So this part is going to take a while. I’ll understand if you want to skip ahead to the verdict … Reviewing the interior of a minivan is like covering a luxury hotel room or the bridge of submarine. We have oodles of things to talk about, culminating in a vacuum cleaner.

So this part is going to take a while. I'll understand if you want to skip ahead to the verdict ... Reviewing the interior of a minivan is like covering a luxury hotel room or the bridge of submarine. We have oodles of things to talk about, culminating in a vacuum cleaner.

Matthew DeBord/BI

The instrument cluster and steering wheel continue a theme of ergonomic excellence for Honda. The leather-wrapped wheel feels good, the controls are simple to use, and the instruments in the main cluster are simple.

To be honest, as responsive as the Odyssey is to drive — a longtime selling point — the electric-assist steering felt a little funny to me. I liked the more direct sense of connection I got from my old ’07 Odyssey. But hey, it’s heated!

Seats? Up front, they are blissfully comfy.

A closer look at the minimalist digital gauges.

A closer look at the minimalist digital gauges.

Matthew DeBord/BI

The Odyssey Elite features paddle shifters, so you can shift gears in manual mode. In a minivan. Yes, in a minivan. I didn’t really use them. Well, once. But it felt wrong. Not again.

The Odyssey Elite features paddle shifters, so you can shift gears in manual mode. In a minivan. Yes, in a minivan. I didn't really use them. Well, once. But it felt wrong. Not again.

Matthew DeBord/BI

The seats aren’t too fancy, but supportive, nicely bolstered, and up front …

The seats aren't too fancy, but supportive, nicely bolstered, and up front ...

Matthew DeBord/BI

… heated and cooled.

... heated and cooled.

Matthew DeBord/BI

The second and third rows.

The second and third rows.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Getting in and out of the second and third rows is what’s most critical about a minivan. The Odyssey provides a step-in for row two …

Getting in and out of the second and third rows is what's most critical about a minivan. The Odyssey provides a step-in for row two ...

Matthew DeBord/BI

… adds fold-down armrests …

... adds fold-down armrests ...

Matthew DeBord/BI

… and access to the third row without any contortions.

... and access to the third row without any contortions.

Matthew DeBord/BI

The second-row seats can be shifted around in rails, and the center seat can be removed altogether. This means you can create a center pass-through, or pair the two remaining center seats and slide them to one side, making an aisle on the side.

Just so you know, I’m probably leaving some stuff out here. I had the Odyssey Elite for a week, which was barely enough time to get to know the basics, much less plunge into the depth of how its can configured and reconfigured.

The center second-row seat folds down to present three cupholders and a storage compartment. So let’s talk cupholders. The 2018 Odyssey has over a dozen. Heck yeah! CUPHOLDERS!!!

The center second-row seat folds down to present three cupholders and a storage compartment. So let's talk cupholders. The 2018 Odyssey has over a dozen. Heck yeah! CUPHOLDERS!!!

Matthew DeBord/BI

Storage is EVERYWHERE. Owners will need discipline to avoid keeping half of everything they owned stashed in the Odyssey.

Storage is EVERYWHERE. Owners will need discipline to avoid keeping half of everything they owned stashed in the Odyssey.

Matthew DeBord/BI

It’s hard to do justice how large some of the trays and compartments are. You have to move up to big pickups to get anything similar.

It's hard to do justice how large some of the trays and compartments are. You have to move up to big pickups to get anything similar.

Matthew DeBord/BI

By the way, a cool feature in the sunglasses compartment: a convex mirror that lets the driver or front passenger — “dad” or “mom,” in no particular order — see what’s up in the back seats.

By the way, a cool feature in the sunglasses compartment: a convex mirror that lets the driver or front passenger — "dad" or "mom," in no particular order — see what's up in the back seats.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Before we get into the tech features, let’s look at a throwback element to the entertainment system: a flip-down rear screen.

Before we get into the tech features, let's look at a throwback element to the entertainment system: a flip-down rear screen.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Two sets of wireless headphones enable rear passengers to watch what they want without disturbing everybody else.

Two sets of wireless headphones enable rear passengers to watch what they want without disturbing everybody else.

Matthew DeBord/BI

 

These rear systems are intended to small kids who aren’t into devices yet. The new Odyssey has 4G LTE WiFi connectivity, so many older kids and teenagers will simply prefer their own mobile gadgets. But for younger children, the value of being able to pop a DVD in or use some of the Odyssey’s built in streaming and USB-interface options will be appealing to parents.

A Blu-Ray DVD player!

A Blu-Ray DVD player!

Matthew DeBord/BI

The central infotainment touchscreen isn’t huge, but it’s perfectly adequate.

The central infotainment touchscreen isn't huge, but it's perfectly adequate.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Honda doesn’t have the best infotainment system in the business — GM’s and Audi’s are better — but in the Odyssey, you’re not lacking for anything. There’s an 11-speaker premium audio system. Bluetooth and USB connectivity, plenty of places to plug in (as well as 110V regular outlet), AUX ports, navigation, and a voice-command setup.

Honda doesn't have the best infotainment system in the business — GM's and Audi's are better — but in the Odyssey, you're not lacking for anything. There's an 11-speaker premium audio system. Bluetooth and USB connectivity, plenty of places to plug in (as well as 110V regular outlet), AUX ports, navigation, and a voice-command setup.

Matthew DeBord/BI

The backup camera provides multiple views.

The backup camera provides multiple views.

Matthew DeBord/BI

This overhead is useful when backing such a large vehicle into tight spots.

This overhead is useful when backing such a large vehicle into tight spots.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Accessing the entertainment options is simple.

Accessing the entertainment options is simple.

Matthew DeBord/BI

And the screen’s views can be customized.

And the screen's views can be customized.

Matthew DeBord/BI

You can switch on the rear-seat camera …

You can switch on the rear-seat camera ...

Matthew DeBord/BI

… control the temperature back there …

... control the temperature back there ...

Matthew DeBord/BI

… and even speak to folks in the second and third rows using the CabinTalk feature! It works even with those who are wearing the wireless headphones.

... and even speak to folks in the second and third rows using the CabinTalk feature! It works even with those who are wearing the wireless headphones.

Matthew DeBord/BI

The infotainment system is jam packed, but after all this is a minivan, so you can discover all manner of intriguing features if you root around. Such as this concealed funnel, in case you run our of gas and need to refuel from a gas can.

The infotainment system is jam packed, but after all this is a minivan, so you can discover all manner of intriguing features if you root around. Such as this concealed funnel, in case you run our of gas and need to refuel from a gas can.

Matthew DeBord/BI

And lest you think the Odyssey is a big, dark box, there’s a massive sunroof to let in the rays.

And lest you think the Odyssey is a big, dark box, there's a massive sunroof to let in the rays.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Let’s get into some nuts and bolts. Honda used a push-button start-stop and a push-button shifting system. The old shift lever is gone. The transmission is a 10-speed automatic.

Let's get into some nuts and bolts. Honda used a push-button start-stop and a push-button shifting system. The old shift lever is gone. The transmission is a 10-speed automatic.

Matthew DeBord/BI

The motor will turn itself on and off to save fuel and reduce emissions, but you can disable the function. In addition to a normal drive mode, there’s a “sequential” mode that engages the paddle shifters. Econ and snow modes max out fuel economy (which is 19 city/28 highway/22 combined according to the EPA) and help with traction in sloppy weather.

The motor will turn itself on and off to save fuel and reduce emissions, but you can disable the function. In addition to a normal drive mode, there's a "sequential" mode that engages the paddle shifters. Econ and snow modes max out fuel economy (which is 19 city/28 highway/22 combined according to the EPA) and help with traction in sloppy weather.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Transmission with lots of gears like the Odyssey’s 10-speed have come in for some criticism. They’re designed to provide great MPGs, but some consumers have complained that drivetrains get confused with all the extra choices beyond the older six- and seven-speed units, particularly on downshifts.

The Odyssey presented none of those problems. Then again, most folks won’t drive their minivans in a spirited enough fashion to notice anything, and while the fuel-economy is solid for a vehicle of this size, it isn’t great, so every little bit helps.

And now for the coolest feature on the Odyssey Elite: the HondaVAC! That’s right, Honda put a vacuum cleaner in a minivan. Genius!

And now for the coolest feature on the Odyssey Elite: the HondaVAC! That's right, Honda put a vacuum cleaner in a minivan. Genius!

Matthew DeBord/BI

It stows in its own compartment and comes with two attachments.

It stows in its own compartment and comes with two attachments.

Matthew DeBord/BI

This isn’t a super-powerful vacuum, but it’s good enough to keep the spills that naturally occur in a vehicle intended to haul around families from reaching critical mass.

This isn't a super-powerful vacuum, but it's good enough to keep the spills that naturally occur in a vehicle intended to haul around families from reaching critical mass.

Matthew DeBord/BI

I wanted to test out the HondaVAC on the Honda, but I didn’t get it dirty enough. Then I thought, hey, why not use the HondaVAC to tidy up my Prius! That’s right, I used to HONDA to clean a TOYOTA!

I wanted to test out the HondaVAC on the Honda, but I didn't get it dirty enough. Then I thought, hey, why not use the HondaVAC to tidy up my Prius! That's right, I used to HONDA to clean a TOYOTA!

Matthew DeBord/BI

Prepare yourself, filthy Prius!

Prepare yourself, filthy Prius!

Matthew DeBord/BI

Nice and clean!

Nice and clean!

Matthew DeBord/BI

A compartment houses the vacuum unit for easy access, to empty all those spilled Cheerios.

A compartment houses the vacuum unit for easy access, to empty all those spilled Cheerios.

Matthew DeBord/BI

Well, that was a marathon. So, what’s the 2018 Odyssey like to drive?

Well, that was a marathon. So, what's the 2018 Odyssey like to drive?

Matthew DeBord/BI

 

Frankly, I don’t think it drives as well as earlier generations, but it still drives better than the competition. The 0-60 is a shocking 6.6 seconds, but to be expected from the Odyssey’s tasty 3.5-liter, 280-horsepower V6, one of the greatest engines available on any vehicle. If you want merging and passing power, the Odyssey delivers, as it always has.

The minivan is large and weighs over 4,000 pounds, but it’s easy to maneuver, with responsive steering and good brakes. As with most vehicles in this price range, a host of safety features are on deck: adaptive cruise control, lane-keep assist, lane-departure warning, emergency braking. You are surrounded by the air bags and the Odyssey typically receives high marks for crashworthiness, although our tester model year hadn’t yet been rated by the government.

In my experience as an Odyssey owner, reliability is good and it doesn’t cost that much to maintain this minivan. Longevity is also notable. I’ve seen ancient examples still performing admirable family duty, and although you might bang a minivan up and render the seating areas sort of disgusting, the vehicle always cleans up well.

The versatility is unbeatable and always has been, and Honda has done great job of updating and upgrading a venerable platform. The latest generation is completely current as far as modern infotainment and connectivity go.

Obviously, there are minivan people and there are SUV people. For the SUV people, Honda has the excellent Pilot, a three-row ute that avoids the minivan stigma.

But for those who don’t care and simply want a multipurpose hauler that won’t fail, is sort of fun to drive, and can carry tons and tons of stuff on vacation, to sports practices, and is relatively economical to operate as a daily vehicle, the Odyssey is tough to beat. It even comes with an extra dash of exterior style for the 2018 edition.

It’s difficult to know where Honda goes next with its wonderful minivan. Perhaps a snazzier infotainment system is in order, but that’s about all I can think if to complain about. Otherwise, if you’re looking for the finest minivan ever built by human hands, look no further than the 2018 Odyssey.

Honda Indy Toronto raises nearly $90,000 for Make-A-Wish® Canada

Eight years of fan and partner generosity exceeds $600,000

TORONTO, ON (July 18, 2017) – Thanks to the incredible generosity of race fans, the Ontario Honda Dealers Association (OHDA) and the Honda Canada Foundation (HCF), nearly $90,000 was raised for Make-A-Wish® Canada during the Honda Indy Toronto race weekend.  This marks the eighth consecutive year of Make-A-Wish® fundraising efforts at the race, which has generated a total of more than $600,000 for the organization dedicated to granting wishes for children with life threatening medical conditions. All contributions from race fans over the weekend were matched dollar-for-dollar by the Honda Canada Foundation, Honda Canada’s national charitable arm.

“This is a true reflection of how big people’s hearts are and I know that everyone at Make-A-Wish shares in my excitement and sincere gratitude to Indy fans, the Honda Canada Foundation and Ontario Honda dealers,” said Jennifer Klotz-Ritter, president & CEO, Make-A-Wish Canada. “Programs like this play an instrumental role in our ability to bring strength and happiness to the lives of children with life-threatening medical conditions.”

Race fans of all ages were once again treated to the speed and spectacle of the race and the fun of the surrounding festival on Fan Friday. Instead of admission, attendees were encouraged to make a contribution to Make-A-Wish upon entry into the race. Donations were also accepted throughout race weekend for a variety of games and activities including face painting, racing simulators, James Hinchcliffe suit signing and Honda Junior Red Riders off-road riding program.  New for 2017 was the addition of a raffle where race fans had the chance to win exclusive prizes, including once-in-a-lifetime experiences from the NHL®, Toronto Blue JaysTM, and many others.

“This is exactly what the Honda Canada Foundation is all about and the common values we share with Canadians,” said Dave Jamieson, Chair of the Honda Canada Foundation “We’re thrilled about what we’ve accomplished together with thousands of Indy fans, our dealers and the many Honda Canada Foundation partners.”

About the Honda Canada Foundation
Formed in 2005, the Honda Canada Foundation (HCF) aims to enable the realization of dreams through various annual philanthropic activities and funding to non-profit registered charities across Canada where Honda customers and associates live, work and play.  The HCF focuses on four key pillars – family, environment, engineering and education – and each year more than $1 million is disbursed to groups in need through more than 500 grants.  More than five million Canadians have benefited from Honda Canada- and Honda Canada Foundation-funded charitable programs.

About the Ontario Honda Dealers Association
The Ontario Honda Dealers Association, which was founded in 1989, represents 80 Honda dealers located in 66 communities throughout Ontario, which is home to the two Honda of Canada Mfg. assembly plants that produce Civic, Canada’s best-selling passenger car for 19 consecutive years, in addition to the CR-V.  Honda dealerships in Ontario, which have a proven track record for providing maximum customer satisfaction, employ approximately 3,000 associates.

About Make-A-Wish® Canada
Make-A-Wish Canada is a dynamic wish-granting organization that brings hope, strength and joy to children with life-threatening medical conditions. Along with the national office, eight regional chapters grant magical wishes to children in need from coast to coast. Make-A-Wish Canada is an affiliate of Make-A-Wish® International. Make-A-Wish® is the largest wish-granting organization in the world, making dreams and wishes come true for more than 415,000 children since 1980. For more information, please visit www.makeawish.ca.

About the Honda Indy Toronto
Honda Indy Toronto takes place on the historic grounds of Exhibition Place in a unique lakefront and downtown setting. As Ontario’s largest annual sporting event, the event has become a prestigious meeting place for some of the world’s fastest race car drivers. Since 1986, the three-day event has entertained millions of fans thanks to world-class entertainment and exhilarating performances from drivers including Scott Dixon, Marco Andretti and Helio Castroneves, as well as Canadian legends Paul Tracy, Greg Moore and James Hinchcliffe. The event is owned and operated by Green Savoree Racing Promotions, which also promotes The Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio (July 28-30, 2017) and the Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg (March 9-11, 2018).

Honda Civic Type R review: the first UK test

Stephen Dobie

 

Source: https://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/honda/civic-type-r/20-vtec-turbo-type-r-5dr/first-drive

The Honda Civic Type R. I know this…

It’s been hard to escape it recently. We’ve driven it overseas, but recently we had the chance to drive the first car to land in the UK. That’s an opportunity not to be missed.

One, because it’s the most talked about hot hatch in years. Two, because our high praise for the car in Germany might well crumble on broken British roads. Time to find out.

What are the specs?

Like the ‘FK2’ Civic it replaces, this new ‘FK8’ Civic uses a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbo engine. It’s still a VTEC, though, so it likes to rev, too.

Power is 316bhp – up just 10bhp on the old Type R – while torque is the same, at 295lb ft. The car weighs about the same, too, so its 5.7sec 0-62mph time and 169mph top speed are barely different. But that’s okay. This isn’t really a numbers car.

Over 300bhp, though. Is it still front-wheel drive?

It is, with a limited-slip differential on the front axle to help make sure the power isn’t all spun away as the car scrabbles for grip. Mightily effective it is, too.

There’s a new Comfort suspension mode (as well as the existing Sport and +R modes), while the rear suspension is a new multi-link setup. All you need to know is it makes the Type R considerably more comfortable before, and more stable at speed, too.

Does it ride properly on UK roads, then?

It does. The old car was a wonderfully exciting thing, but it could be blooming hard work over rough surfaces. Its +R mode was almost unusable, the car torque steering like mad in its lower gears if the road was bumpy, while you’d be wincing every time a pothole neared. It needed commitment.

The new car loses none of the excitement, but it can suddenly handle whichever roads you throw at it. I’d been fiddling with the drive modes on the motorway and turned onto a bumpy backroad still in +R mode, something I didn’t even notice until I pulled over later on to fuel up. It’s still no softie, but it’s now purposefully firm rather than downright stiff, and +R ought to be the default mode for keen drivers.

Is it quick?

It really is. At 1,380kg it’s a light car for its class, particularly given how big the Civic has become; it feels enormous these days. So while its power hasn’t risen much over its predecessor, the FK8’s ability to put that power down and avoid torque steer means it feels much quicker and more effective than the FK2 when you want to use its performance on the road.

The front end grip is tremendous, too. You can turn into corners at bafflingly high speeds, the Civic completely resisting understeer, then get on the throttle super early. There’s a little bit of lag in the engine’s delivery – not much, mind – so by the time it spools up you’re leaving the corner, the diff subtly but assertively dragging you onto the next straight.

It’s not a car to flamboyantly throw around like a Ford Focus RS (though there’s adjustability in the chassis if you want it), but that doesn’t mean it’s not thrilling. Quite the opposite. Its ruthless appetite for speed makes it feel every inch the tarmac rally car its new body kit makes it resemble.

Ah yes, the looks…

I’m not going to cast too much judgement, for styling is an entirely subjective thing. But there is rather a lot of styling, aero accoutrements seemingly everywhere you look. The row of vortex generators on the roof are pure Evo IX FQ-400, while the overall silhouette brings to mind the late 2000s Impreza WRX STI hatchback.

All of the aero is functional, we’re told, though the bonnet air scoop doesn’t seem to lead anywhere. The triple exhausts do serve a purpose, mind; the middle pipe boosts the whooooarrgh under acceleration (which is excellent) yet cuts down boominess on the motorway.

Sounds very sensible.

It works, too. For all the brilliance of the Civic’s chassis and the punch of its performance – both of which deserve a lot of praise – it’s the refinement that’s most stark about this new car. It may look like a motorsport refugee, but it’ll require no change in lifestyle if it’s your only car.

The boot’s massive, there’s more legroom than ever, there’s loads of anti-crash tech and it’s quiet and comfortable at the everyday stuff. To be a proper hot hatch all-rounder, these things are important. And Honda’s nailed them this time around.

Yawn. Tell me more exciting things.

The steering is great for an electronic, variable-ratio system and plays its part in just how faithful the front end of this car is. The seats are even better than before, more hugging, even redder and sitting much lower in the car. Get in a Focus RS after this and it feels like you’re sat on the roof.

The gearbox remains wonderful, too. Honda has rigidly stuck with a manual gearbox – paddleshifts just add weight and complication – and it remains one of the tightest, most satisfying shifts on sale at any price, while the car now blips your downchanges for you. Japanese performance engines have always felt more sensitively set up than others, more appreciative of a rev-matched downchange. The system is brilliant and rarely fluffs a shift.

You can turn it off, too, and part of the Civic’s magic is that it’ll make you want to raise your own game to get the best out of it. That wasn’t untrue of the old car, but the new one is tangibly better in every area and more useable, more of the time. It could be the best hot hatch on sale.

Road closures in place as Honda Indy ready to roar on Lake Shore

The roar on the Lake Shore runs from July 14-16

NEWS Jul 12, 2017 10:40 Parkdale Villager

Source: https://www.insidetoronto.com/news-story/7419160-road-closures-in-place-as-honda-indy-ready-to-roar-on-lake-shore/

Honda Indy Toronto

Team Penskie’s Helio Castroneves makes his way past the Princes’ Gates during Verizon Indycar practice Friday at the Hondy Indy Toronto. July 15, 2016 – Dan Pearce/Metroland

The Honda Indy is back and is taking over Toronto’s Lake Shore Boulevard from July 14 to 16 and with it comes some road closures.

As of noon on Wednesday, July 12, southbound Strachan Avenue will be closed from Fleet Street to Lake Shore Boulevard West. At 8 p.m., Lake Shore Boulevard West will be closed from Strachan to British Columbia Drive.

The headlining event, the 85-lap Verizon IndyCar Series race, will take place on Sunday and feature the series’ top drivers such as defending winner Will Power and crowd favourite: Ontario’s own James Hinchcliffe.

Sunday’s events follow Saturday’s headliner of the Pinty’s Grand Prix of Toronto featuring the stars of the NASCAR Pinty’s Series. This event includes Canadian racing icons such as Alex Tagliani and 2017 Daytona 500 runner D.J. Kennington.

Friday also marks the 31st running of Fan Friday, where fans gain general admission access to all the event’s high octane excitement.

Honda will continue to ramp up the event’s entertainment by bringing the NHL Centennial Fan Arena to the Honda SpeedZone in Thunder Alley, as part of its North American tour. 

Also featured in Honda World is Honda Canada’s Junior Red Riders program, allowing kids aged six-to-12 years to suit up in the proper safety equipment and ride Honda dirt bikes. 

“Our team and partners at Honda Canada and Ontario Honda Dealers take great pride in the range of entertainment that we provide festival-goers in Toronto over the race weekend,” said Jeff Atkinson, President of Honda Indy Toronto, in a press release.

“It’s going to be non-stop racing action on any days that fans attend.”

Two-day general admission is $50 and two-day reserved grandstand seats start at $80 including taxes.  Kids 12 and under receive free general admission throughout the weekend when accompanied by a ticketed adult. For complete ticket pricing and event information, visit hondaindy.com or call 877-725-8849.

Why the 2017 Honda Civic Type R Has Three Tailpipes

Source: http://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars/car-technology/a10032609/why-the-2017-honda-civic-type-r-has-three-tailpipes/

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is here, and it’s a knockout. The most hardcore Civic ever packs 306 turbocharged horses and claims to be the fastest front-drive car to ever lap the Nurburgring.

But what’s up with that triple-tip exhaust? Some folks seem to think it’s just an unnecessary styling feature, but it’s much more than that—it’s a precisely engineered, fully functional addition that’s crucial to the Type R’s aural experience. Road & Track spoke with Rob Keough, senior product planner for the 10th-generation Civic, to find out why a four-cylinder car is breathing through three tailpipes of two different diameters.

HONDA

“Traditionally with these big flow exhaust systems, when you get up into highway speeds, you can get a lot of droning, booming, buzzing—not very comfortable for high speed cruising,” Keough told R&T. Honda wanted to offer a sporty, engaging sound in aggressive driving, without punishing drivers on long commutes or highway trips. And the automaker wanted to do so without resorting to stereo-enhanced engine sounds or complex (and expensive) multi-mode muffler systems.

The solution is to split the single exhaust into three pipes just behind the rear axle. The two outer pipes include large straight-flow mufflers. The center, smaller diameter pipe is a resonator, shaped and sized to perform a particular aural trick.

HONDA

At low speed—say, as you’re full-throttle accelerating from a dead stop—some of the exhaust flows through the center resonator, generating a louder, more aggressive growl. “You’ll hear it both outside and inside the car,” Keough said. As you settle in to high speed cruising, the exhaust flowing through the center outlet hits a resonant frequency. The resonator gets stuffed with air, stalling the airflow; the resulting backpressure diverts the exhaust to flow exclusively through the larger outboard mufflers, reducing the cabin noise at highway speeds.

“It basically diminishes the resonator effect at that point, attenuating the sound inside the car,” Keough said. “You still get your big flow through the outboard pipes, but you get a more refined in-cabin experience at high-speed cruising. ” Under certain conditions, the center resonator can actually begin sucking air in, Keough said, creating a venturi effect flowing out through the outboard pipes.

“When it’s not flowing through the center resonator, it’s not generating that extra resonance. So it’s not like you have zero exhaust sound, but you’re not generating this extra sporty sound that comes from the resonator,” Keough told R&T. Additional insulation and aerodynamic tweaks to the Civic Type R help reduce in-cabin noise on the highway even further.

HONDA

While the exhaust system precisely manipulates sound and flow based on RPM and speed, there are zero moving parts and no electronics involved. That stays in line with the Type R’s identity as a raw, honest machine, not the type of vehicle where you’d expect to find faked exhaust notes coming through the stereo. It also helps keep the one-trim-level-only Civic Type R’s sticker price in the $34,000 range. “We didn’t build in servos or flap valves,” Keough said. “This is a very simply designed system where you’re getting the effect without additional moving parts. It’s a very durable, low cost and effective solution.”

Of course, the Civic Type R is the kind of car that aftermarket tuners love to fiddle with—especially now that it’s coming to the US market for the very first time. I asked Keough if he’ll be frustrated to see owners cutting out this painstakingly-engineered three-tip system and replacing it with a big, boomy exhaust.

“We kind of anticipate that,” he said. “We wanted to deliver a high quality, sporty, but refined experience for this customer, but we already know some kids are gonna want more noise. We’re not going to be particularly offended.”

Refreshed 2018 Honda Fit Launches This Summer with More Aggressive Styling, New Sport Trim and Available Honda Sensing

2018 HONDA FIT

• More youthful and emotional styling enhances Fit’s sporty character
• Honda Sensing® adds safety and driver assistive technologies to Honda’s
benchmark subcompact
• New style and features add to Fit’s best-in-class space, refinement,
practicality, fuel efficiency and affordability

MARKHAM, Ont., Jun. 12, 2017 – Honda today revealed the 2018 Fit with fresh new styling, the addition of a Sport trim and the availability of Honda Sensing® on its popular hatchback. Updated styling at the front and rear, and a splash of additional color add vibrancy and infuse the versatile Fit with an enhanced youthful, sporty and emotional character. The availability of Honda Sensing® brings the suite of advanced safety and driver assistive technologies to the subcompact Fit.

“With sporty new styling and additional feature content, the 2018 Honda Fit ups the ante with new styling and sophistication not typically found in the subcompact segment,” said Jean Marc Leclerc, Senior Vice-President Sales and Marketing, Honda Canada Inc. “Fit has always represented a great value for subcompact customers and the addition of available Honda Sensing® to its fun-to-drive performance and unmatched versatility will keep the Honda Fit as the industry’s benchmark subcompact.”

The 2018 Honda Fit features new, sportier styling, starting with a horizontally layered, two-piece chrome and piano black grille with a larger, more prominent “H” mark. The more integrated and sophisticated headlights blend into the side edges of the upper fascia’s wing creating a unified yet more aggressive design. The front bumper sports top chrome accents and features a full-width splitter, along with more angular fog lights pods.

At the rear, the Fit’s low and wide sporty styling continues with a redesigned bumper featuring a full-width character line in piano black and a splitter-shaped lower section. A newly styled taillight combo completes the Fit’s sharper looking rear.

Positioned between the LX and EX trims, the new Fit Sport trim features an even more aggressive and sporty look with aero form features at the front, sides and rear, and a low and sharp front splitter highlighted in bright orange. An exclusive black finish on the 16-inch alloy wheels further adds to the sporty look. At the rear, a three-strake diffuser with bright orange upper trim line, chrome exhaust finisher and Sport badge complete the Fit Sport’s aggressive exterior styling.

A new vibrant color –Orange Fury – join an expanded color pallet that includes White Orchid Pearl, Modern Steel Metallic, Crystal Black Pearl, Milano Red and Aegean Blue Metallic.

Standard on all CVT trims is the Honda Sensing® suite of safety features that includes Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), Collision Mitigation Brake Braking System™ (CMBS™), Lane Keeping Assist System (LKAS) incorporating Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Road Departure Mitigation (RDM) incorporating Road Departure Warning (RDW). The Fit comes with the most robust suite of available advanced safety and driver-assistive technologies in its class in Canada.

This is the third-generation Fit’s first update since the launch of the 2015 model in 2014. More in-depth information about the upgrades to the 2018 Fit, including expanded feature content will be provided in the near future.

About Honda
Honda Canada Inc. (HCI) was founded in 1969 and is the parent company for both Honda and Acura vehicle brands in Canada. The company has produced more than 7.8 million cars and light trucks since 1986 at its two manufacturing facilities and builds engines at a third manufacturing plant in Alliston, Ontario. Both manufacturing facilities are extremely flexible and currently build Honda Civic and CR-V models. Honda Canada has invested more than $4.7 billion in Canada and each year it sources nearly $2.1 billion in goods and services from Canadian suppliers. Honda Canada has sold more than four million Honda and Acura passenger cars and light trucks in Canada.

And the winning bid for the first Honda Civic Type R auction is …

Written by: Greg Rasa

Jun 15th 2017 at 6:01PM

Source: http://www.autoblog.com/2017/06/15/honda-civic-type-r-auction-results/

2017 Honda Civic Type R VIN 1

 

We told you a few days ago that the first US Honda Civic Type R was going to be auctioned online at Bring-a-Trailer. Two days later, we reported that the bidding had already hit $200,000 – and noted that it was a curious strategy to drop such a big bid so early in an auction. Well, maybe it wasn’t: Apparently it drove all the other bidders away, as $200,000 takes the car.

That’s a handsome sum for a car with a base MSRP of $34,775. But this isn’t just any Honda Civic, nor any Type R. It’s the first one to enter the US, with VIN No. 01, in an Aegean Blue paint that oh-so-smartly complements its red Type R badging. Above all, the proceeds benefit the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation. And even though no one could outbid the as-yet-unnamed lucky winner, people are making contributions to the foundation nonetheless as a result of the auction.

 

2018 Honda Accord set to debut next month

by  NICK TRAGIANIS  | 

Source: http://driving.ca/honda/accord/auto-news/news/2018-honda-accord-set-to-debut-next-month

2018 Honda Accord

Honda promises the next-gen Accord will be the most stylish and premium one to date – and the most fun to drive, too

Honda‘s 10th-generation Accord is officially set to debut in less than a month.

Ahead of the full reveal on July 14, Honda also dropped a glimpse at the new Accord’s front end, promising the most “dramatically styled” model yet. Honda is also keen to point out the new Accord will be the most premium to date, as well as engaging to drive.

While we can’t speak for the finished product, we did recently get a sneak peek at the next-gen Accord and, yes, it lives up to Honda’s fun-to-drive promises. Part of this has to do with the engine; Honda has already confirmed two new turbocharged engines will be available, including a detuned variant of the Civic Type R’s turbo-four pegged as a replacement for the V6. Certainly sad news for some, but the boosted engine should put out around 295 horsepower – more than the outgoing V6, but less than the Type R.

Honda has also already confirmed the new Accord will come with three transmission options – a 10-speed automatic transmission, a CVT and on some trim levels, a six-speed manual. Along with the two new turbocharged engines, the 2018 Accord will also gain a two-motor hybrid powertrain.

We’ll have more details on the 2018 Accord following its debut.